Harry Pearson - Connie - Little, Brown Book Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • Paperback
    More information
    • ISBN:9781408705728
    • Publication date:17 Aug 2017
  • E-Book £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781408705711
    • Publication date:17 Aug 2017

Connie

The Marvellous Life of Learie Constantine

By Harry Pearson

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

A masterful biography of one of the biggest personalities in cricketing history, from the author of The Trundlers and Slipless in Settle.

Winner of the MCC Book of the Year Award

His father was a first-class cricketer, his grandfather was a slave.

Born in rural Trinidad in 1901, Learie Constantine was the most dynamic all-round cricketer of his age (1928-1939) when he played Test cricket for the West Indies and club cricket for Nelson. Few who saw Constantine in action would ever forget the experience.

As well as the cricketing genius that led to Constantine being described as 'the most original cricketer of his time', Connie illuminates the world that he grew up in, a place where the memories of slavery were still fresh and where a peculiar, almost obsessive, devotion to 'Englishness' created a society that was often more British than Britain itself. Harry Pearson looks too at the society Constantine came to in England, which he would embrace as much as it embraced him: the narrow working-class world of the industrial North during a time of grave economic depression. Connie reveals how a flamboyant showman from the West Indies actually dovetailed rather well in a place where local music-hall stars such as George Formby, Frank Randle and Gracie Fields were fêted as heroes, and how Lancashire League cricket fitted into this world of popular entertainment.

Connie tells an uplifting story about sport and prejudice, genius and human decency, and the unlikely cultural exchange between two very different places - the tropical island of Trinidad and the cloth-manufacturing towns of northern England - which shared the common language of cricket.

Biographical Notes

Harry Pearson was born and brought up on the edge of Teesside. He is the author of eight works of non-fiction. The Far Corner - A Mazy Dribble through North-East Football, was runner-up for the William Hill Prize and has been named as one of the Fifty Greatest Sports Books of All Time by both the Observer and The Times. He wrote a weekly sports column in the Guardian from 1996 to 2012, and won the 2011 MCC/Cricket Society Prize for his book about Northern club cricket, Slipless in Settle. He lives in Northumberland.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349140391
  • Publication date: 05 Jul 2018
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: Abacus
At last Constantine has found a biographer capable of telling his magnificent story - Harry Pearson has written a beguiling work that does full justice to this wonderful sportsman and most honourable of men — Peter Oborne, Daily Mail
an excellently researched and sensitively handled account of Constantine's life and impact beyond the game. He was "a 'Champagne cocktail' cricketer - effervescent but with a kick" and half a century on, his story has lost none of its fizz — ESPN.com
Harry Pearson is an author with an aversion to uninteresting sentences. Connie is a constantly engaging study — Giles Smith, The Times
Cricket fans will cherish . . . and Harry Pearson 's admirable Learie Constantine biography Connie — Huw Richards, Guardian
A beautiful book — New European
Abacus

The Amazing Test Match Crime

Adrian Alington
Authors:
Adrian Alington

The best cricket novel ever written . . .Before 'Sandpapergate' there was The Amazing Test Match Crime.'Cricket is the great narrative sport, and a close, hard-fought Test Match is the nearest any sport comes to the structure, rhythm and feel of a good novel. The opening is there, if someone is brave enough to take it . . .' Marcus BerkmannEngland are due to play Australia Imperia (names have been changed for legal reasons) at the Oval, in the final Test of the summer.The series hangs in the balance when England's Captain and star player disappears without trace . . .A wonderful novel which reads like a cross between an episode of Blackadder and England, Their England.

Hachette Books

The Pride of the Yankees

Richard Sandomir
Authors:
Richard Sandomir

On July 4, 1939, Gehrig delivered what has been called "baseball's Gettysburg Address" at Yankee Stadium. There is, for now, no known, intact film of Gehrig's speech, but instead, just a swatch of the newsreel footage has survived, incorporating his opening and closing remarks: "For the past two weeks you have been reading about the bad break I got. Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of this earth," the last line, of course, having become one of the most famous, invoked, and inspiring, ever, anywhere. The New York Times account, the following day, called it "one of the most touching scenes ever witnessed on a ball field", that made even hard-boiled reporters "swallow hard." The scene and the story would likely have been largely lost to history, altogether, were it not for the film, Pride of the Yankees, best known for Gary Cooper, as the dying Lou Gehrig, movingly describing himself as "the luckiest man on the face of the earth," even as his body was being ravaged by the disease that was soon named after him. Here, now, in Pride of the Yankees and the Legend of Lou Gehrig by Richard Sandomir, New York Times sports columnist, is, for the first time, the full story behind the pioneering, seminal movie. Filled with larger than life characters and unexpected facts, Pride of the Yankees shows us how Samuel Goldwyn had no desire to making a baseball film but he was persuaded to make a quick deal with Lou's widow, Eleanor, not long after Gehrig had passed; Hollywood icon Cooper had zero knowledge of baseball and had to be taught to play; unknown parts of the screen treatment and screenplay that will be written about for the first time; and dishy letters to Eleanor from Christy Walsh, the pioneering business manager who represented the Gehrigs, from the Los Angeles set. Nostalgic, breezy and fun, Pride of the Yankees captures a lost time in film and sports history.

Constable

Can I Carry Your Bags?

Martin Johnson
Authors:
Martin Johnson

In nearly 25 years as a sports journalist for the Independent, Daily Telegraph, and The Sunday Times, Martin Johnson has covered sporting events all over the world, including cricket and tennis in Australia, golf in America, Formula One in Kuala Lumpur, boxing in Cairo, petanque in Gran Canaria, beach volleyball in Brazil, Olympics in Sydney, football in China, and rugby in South Africa. Sounds like a nice job? You must be joking. Get the true story from sports journalism's equivalent of Victor Meldrew. Ever tried to get a phone call out of Nagpur? Make contact with the office from Norfolk Island? Trudged several miles up a Japanese mountain to watch Britain's No 1 woman skier plough straight through the first gate? Attempted to write a semi-coherent report after a night out with Ian Botham? Nearly frozen to death at a cricket match in New Zealand? Been hi-jacked in Moscow by a drunken Russian? It's hell out there, says Martin, who makes out his case for a life of hardship, deprivation, and a breathless dedication to duty in the face of overwhelming odds. Frankly, however, we still think it reads more like the Life of Riley.

Da Capo Press

Chasing Perfection

Andy Glockner
Authors:
Andy Glockner
PublicAffairs

The Game's Not Over

Gregg Easterbrook
Authors:
Gregg Easterbrook
Sphere

Kevin Pietersen on Cricket

Kevin Pietersen
Authors:
Kevin Pietersen
Robinson

My Shed And How It Was Built

Donato Cinicolo
Authors:
Donato Cinicolo

This book offers those who may be thinking of building their own own shed practical constructional advice and use of materials; all of the sheds in the book have actually been built, and are not just ideas. It contains interesting stories about the shed owners and how they overcame problems or how they found unusual, cheap solutions (such as the use of old printing plates for roofing). Each shed, and its contents, gives an interesting insight into its owner's character.

Da Capo Lifelong Books

The Ultra Mindset

John Hanc, Travis Macy
Authors:
John Hanc, Travis Macy
Black Dog & Leventhal

A History Of Baseball In 100 Objects

Josh Leventhal
Authors:
Josh Leventhal
Da Capo Lifelong Books

Bike for Life

Roy M. Wallack
Authors:
Roy M. Wallack
Da Capo Press

1954

Bill Madden
Authors:
Bill Madden

1954,A triumphant season for black ballplayers and the countryaward-winning New York Times bestselling author Bill Madden delivers the first major book to fully examine the 1954 baseball season, drawn largely from exclusive recent interviews with the major players themselves, including Willie Mays and Larry Doby as well as New York baseball legends from that era: Yogi Berra and Whitey Ford of the Yankees, Monte Irvin of the Giants, and Carl Erskine of the Dodgers. 1954 transports readers across the baseball landscape of the time as future superstars such as Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, and others entered the leagues and continued to integrate the sport. Weaving together the narrative of one of baseball's greatest seasons wit the racially charged events of that year,the same in which the US Supreme Court unanimously ruled that segregation of the races be outlawed in America's public schools, 1954 demonstrates how our national pastime was actually ahead of the curve in terms of the acceptance of black Americans, while the nation at large continued to struggle with tolerance.

Sphere

Barry

Steve Parrish, Nick Harris
Authors:
Steve Parrish, Nick Harris
Abacus

Stamping Grounds

Charlie Connelly
Authors:
Charlie Connelly

STAMPING GROUNDS follows the Liechtenstein national football team through their defeat-strewn qualifying campaign for the 2002 World Cup. Drawn in a group with Israel, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Austria and mighty Spain, it was hard to see the principality's part-time players scoring even one goal, never mind adding to its meagre international points total. So what motivates a nation of 30,000 people and eleven villages to keep plugging away despite the inevitability of defeat? Travelling to all of Liechenstein's qualifying matches, Charlie Connelly examines what motivates a team to take the field dressed proudly in the shirts of Liechtenstein despite the knowledge that they are, with notably few exceptions, in for a damn good hiding.Sampling the delights of Liechtenstein's capital, Vaduz, such as the Postage Stamp Museum, the State Art Museum and, er, the Postage Stamp Museum again, Connelly provides an evocative and witty account of the land where every year on National Day the sovereign invites the entire population into his garden for a glass of wine.

Abacus

The Trundlers

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson
Da Capo Press

The Magnificent Masters

Gil Capps
Authors:
Gil Capps
Constable

Accidental Ironman

Martyn Brunt
Authors:
Martyn Brunt

Having spent 10 years scaling the lower echelons of the sport, the time has come for one of Britain's least successful athletes to reveal all about how he got involved in all this nonsense in the first place. Marvel as he reveals: His sporting history - how being last pick at school football in the 1970s set him on course for a lifetime of being rubbish at team games. How he took up triathlons in the first place (for a bet, and the cow who made it with him never paid up). How he overcame a crippling lack of talent and a chorus of complete indifference from his family to complete 10 Ironmans, all outside the top 500 finishers. The many triathlon adventures he has experienced over the past 10 years (cow pats, Ironmans, incontinence, driving bans, broken bones, public nudity, spending entire redundancy payments on a new bike, Belgian portaloos, German knocking shops, sunburnt arse cheeks, channel swimming, fights with chavs, obsessions with weather and the nutritional value of Jaffa Cakes, 3 hour marathons, chronic dehydration and so on). The many and varied idiots he's got to know as a result of taking up the sport (aka his mates). The typical training (hell) he goes through to take part in a race given he has absolutely no ability whatsoever. How triathlons ultimately caused him to sell his Mercedes, give away his expensive suit, chuck in his job in the City and become, as his father put it, a "god-damned hippy" (A cycle path designer who owns a camper van).

Running Press Adult

Mind of the Demon

Joe Layden, Larry Linkogle
Authors:
Joe Layden, Larry Linkogle
Abacus

Hound Dog Days

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson
PublicAffairs

The Summer of Beer and Whiskey

Edward Achorn
Authors:
Edward Achorn
Abacus

Playing Hard Ball

E.T. Smith
Authors:
E.T. Smith

PLAYING HARD BALL is a unique sports book, a cultural comparison of two national games - cricket, English in origin and American baseball - written from the viewpoint of a top-class practitioner of both codes. Ed Smith - the young Cambridge University and Kent batsman - has spent the winters since 1998 in Spring Training with the New York Mets baseball team. It has enabled Ed to contrast and compare arguably the two most iconic of sports from the inside. In fact, baseball had a thriving following in Britain until the Great War: Derby County's former stadium was called the Baseball Ground; Tottenham Hotspur was at first a baseball club. Apart from learning two very different techniques, Ed learned that the sports' ultimate heroes, the Babe and the Don - Babe Ruth and Don Bradman - might as well have come from different planets, whilst baseball's pristine Hall of Fame in Cooperstown is a far cry from the ramshackle cricket museum at Lord's. Ed Smith's PLAYING HARD BALL draws on these intriguing comparisons to paint a two-sided portrait of sports most illustrous 'hitting games'.