Polly Devlin - All Of Us There - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781844080441
    • Publication date:04 Dec 2003
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All Of Us There

By Polly Devlin

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  • £P.O.R.

* A beautifully written memoir of growing up Catholic in Northern Ireland

Polly Devlin grew up in County Tyrone, on the shores of Lough Neagh, in the fifties -- but it might as well have been another time and place altogether. In this memoir she describes in witty, spontaneous and idiosyncratic prose her life as one of seven siblings in a Catholic family in Northern Ireland.

'A brooding, evocative study of Irish childhood, of the strong bonds of love and jealousy that sisters especially feel, the guilt-ridden pressures of religion, the magical countryside, the eccentric villagers. A hauntingly lovely work ... beautifully written with poetic intensity which seems to encapsulate the Irish character with all its wit and bitterness and gift for words' HOMES AND GARDENS

Biographical Notes

Polly Devlin (b. 1944) is a well-known journalist (Vogue, Observer, Sun. Times) and broadcaster who has worked in both Britain and America. Currently writing a novel for Chatto, she divides her time between Dublin, London and Somerset.

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  • ISBN: 9780349007823
  • Publication date: 03 Sep 2015
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Virago
Grand Central Publishing

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