Victoria Pepe - I Call Myself A Feminist - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Paperback £13.99
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    • ISBN:9780349006550
    • Publication date:05 Nov 2015
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    • ISBN:9780349008455
    • Publication date:01 Jun 2016

I Call Myself A Feminist

The View from Twenty-Five Women Under Thirty

By Victoria Pepe

  • E-Book
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Twenty-five girls and women under thirty tell us why they call themselves feminists. Punchy, bold, urgent. A book for our times.

Is feminism still a dirty word? We asked twenty-five of the brightest, funniest, bravest young women what being a feminist in 2015 means to them.

We hear from Laura Bates (of the Everyday Sexism Project), Reni Eddo-Lodge (award-winning journalist and author), Yas Necati (an eighteen-year-old activist), Laura Pankhurst, great-great granddaughter of Emmeline Pankhurst and an activist in her own right, comedian Sofie Hagen, engineer Naomi Mitchison and Louise O'Neill, author of the award-winning feminist Young Adult novel Only Ever Yours. Writing about a huge variety of subjects, we have Martha Mosse and Alice Stride on how they became feminists, Amy Annette addressing the body politic, Samira Shackle on having her eyes opened in a hostel for survivors of acid attacks in Islamabad, while Maysa Haque thinks about the way Islam has informed her feminism and Isabel Adomakoh Young insists that women don't have to be perfect. There are twelve other performers, politicians and writers who include Jade Anouka, Emily Benn, Abigail Matson-Phippard, Hajar J. Woodland and Jinan Younis.

Is the word feminist still to be shunned? Is feminism still thought of as anti-men rather than pro-human? Is this generation of feminists - outspoken, funny and focused - the best we've had for long while? Has the internet given them a voice and power previously unknown?

Rachel Holmes' most recent book is Eleanor Marx: A Life; Victoria Pepe is a literary scout; Amy Annette is a comedy producer currently working on festivals including Latitude; Alice Stride works for Women's Aid and Martha Mosse is a freelance producer and artist.

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  • ISBN: 9780349006567
  • Publication date: 05 Nov 2015
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Virago
Full of spirit, candour and good sense . . . provocative in all kinds of ways — Telegraph
It's a real joy to see young women taking up feminism in such positive ways — Herald
Refreshing and eye-opening and much-needed . . . I Call Myself a Feminist might be specifically targeted at younger women but readers of any age stand to learn a whole lot from this anthology — Katie Grant, Independent
There are many chapters here that enlighten, cheer, or rightly anger. Some have real style and swagger . . . the best are often those that refract wider social questions through the prism of personal experience . . . I Call Myself a Feminist provides a lively and heartfelt introduction to many of the flash points of feminism, and manages to be both relatable and inspirational — Independent on Sunday
Virago

Can We All Be Feminists?

June Eric-Udorie
Authors:
June Eric-Udorie

"The intersectional feminist anthology we all need to read" (Bustle), edited by a remarkable and inspiring nineteen-year-old activist who the BBC named one of 100 "inspirational and influential women" of 2016.Why is it difficult for so many women to fully identify with the word "feminist"? How do our personal histories and identities affect our relationship to feminism? Why is intersectionality so important? Can a feminist movement that doesn't take other identities like race, religion, or socioeconomic class into account even be considered feminism? How can we make feminism more inclusive?In Can We All Be Feminists?, seventeen established and emerging writers from diverse backgrounds wrestle with these questions, exploring what feminism means to them in the context of their other identities-from a hijab-wearing Muslim to a disability rights activist to a body-positive performance artist to a transgender journalist. Edited by the brilliant, galvanizing, and dazzlingly precocious nineteen-year-old feminist activist and writer June Eric-Udorie, this impassioned, thought-provoking collection showcases the marginalized women whose voices are so often drowned out and offers a vision for a new, comprehensive feminism that is truly for all.Including essays by: Soofiya Andry, Gabrielle Bellot, Caitlin Cruz, Nicole Dennis-Benn, Brit Bennett, Evette Dionne, Aisha Gani, Afua Hirsch, Juliet Jacques, Wei Ming Kam, Mariya Karimjee, Eishar Kaur, Emer O'Toole, Frances Ryan, Zoé Samudzi, Charlotte Shane, and Selina Thompson.

Orbit

Rosewater

Tade Thompson
Authors:
Tade Thompson

Winner of the inaugural Nommo Award for Best Novel Africa's first award for speculative fiction John W. Campbell Award finalist for Best Science Fiction NovelRosewater is a town on the edge. A community formed around the edges of a mysterious alien biodome, its residents comprise the hopeful, the hungry and the helpless - people eager for a glimpse inside the dome or a taste of its rumoured healing powers. Kaaro is a government agent with a criminal past. He has seen inside the biodome, and doesn't care to again - but when something begins killing off others like himself, Kaaro must defy his masters to search for an answer, facing his dark history and coming to a realisation about a horrifying future.

Virago

The Guilty Feminist

Deborah Frances-White
Authors:
Deborah Frances-White

In 2015 I described myself as 'guilty feminist' for the first time. My goals were noble but my concerns were trivial. I wanted desperately for women to be taken seriously in leadership roles all over the world, but I also wanted to look good sitting down naked.A funny, joyful, frank and inspiring book about embracing both feminism and our imperfections, from the creator of the hit comedy podcast, Deborah Frances-White.From inclusion to the secret power of rom coms, from effective activism to what poker can tell us about gender, Deborah Frances-White explores what it means to be a 21st-century feminist, and encourages us to make the world better for all women.The book also includes exclusive interviews with performers, activists and thinkers - Jessamyn Stanley, Zoe Coombs Marr, Susan Wokoma, Bisha K. Ali, Reubs Walsh, Becca Bunce, Amika George, Mo Mansfied and Leyla Hussein - plus a piece from Hannah Gadsby.Praise for THE GUILTY FEMINIST podcast:'Hilarious, irreverent, eternally surprising, classy as hell, genius comedians ... It's shows like this that breathe life into conversations about feminism' Phoebe Waller-Bridge'If you are the kind of feminist who secretly sings along to Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines then The Guilty Feminist understands your pain' Guardian 50 Best Podcasts'Epitomises the brilliance of being an unapologetic, powerful lady ... Tackles issues from democracy to sexuality to porn with a lightness and hilarity that makes even the newly ordained feminist feel at home' Sunday Times'A refreshingly honest take on the complexities and insecurities of being a woke female today' Grazia

Virago

Fruit of Knowledge

Liv Strömquist
Authors:
Liv Strömquist

An international bestseller, Fruit of Knowledge is a funny, powerful and eye-opening graphic nonfiction book about the female body and our love-hate relationship with it throughout history.From Adam and Eve to pussy hats, people have punished, praised, pathologised and politicised vulvas, vaginas, clitorises, and menstruation. In Fruit of Knowledge, celebrated Swedish cartoonist Liv Strömquist traces how different cultures and traditions have shaped women's health and beyond. Her biting, informed commentary and ponytailed avatar guides the reader from the darkest chapters of history (a clitoridectomy performed on a five-year-old American child as late as 1948) to the lightest (vulvas used as architectural details as a symbol of protection). Like Alison Bechdel and Jacky Fleming, she uses the comics medium to reveal uncomfortable truths about how far we haven't come.'Feminist, snappy, instructive and hilarious!' Time Out Paris'Liv Strömquist's refreshing humour and visionary ability truly make me rejoice' Goteborgs-Posten'Imagine if you could walk through the world with a Liv Strömquist at your side. The moment you stumbled on an injustice or an error in thinking, you could point her at the culprit like a loaded wit-revolver, instead of having to stand there digging through your own murky arguments' Expressen

Sphere

The Bone Readers

Jacob Ross
Authors:
Jacob Ross

WINNER OF THE JHALAK PRIZE'The Bone Readers is a page-turner, but its insights and language are equally testament to a literary novel of impressive depth and acuity' GuardianSecrets can be buried, but bones can speak . . . After standing witness to a murder on the streets of the Caribbean island of Camaho, young Michael 'Digger' Digson is recruited into a unique plain clothes homicide squad, an eclectic group of semi-official police officers, led by the enigmatic DS Chilman.Digger becomes enmeshed in Chilman's obsession with a cold case, the disappearance of a young man. But Digger has a murder to pursue too: that of his mother, killed by a renegade police squad when he was a boy.He has two weapons at his disposal - his skill in forensics, and Chilman's latest recruit, the mysterious, observant Miss Stanislaus. Together, the two find themselves dragged into a world of dangerous secrets that demands every ounce of their courage to survive.This award-winning crime debut by highly acclaimed author Jacob Ross marks the thrilling start to a new series following forensics genius Michael Digson. 'It's masterly. I've started to read it again with increasing admiration' Crime Time'A breath-taking, thought-provoking, and yes brilliant read. I know this is a book I shall go back to again and again' Sunny Singh'Ross's novel is one that effortlessly draws together the past and the present, gender, politics and the legacy of colonialism in a top quality Caribbean set crime thriller. The Bone Readers is a wonderful read'Catherine Johnson 'By turns thrilling, visceral and meditative, and always cinematic' Musa Okwonga 'An unconventional crime novel, and one that exposes the dark underbelly of 'paradise'' Book Muse (blog) 'I was fascinated by Ross' ability to create characters with depth and diversity. A great read' Not Chai tea (blog) 'A unique read, paced to the islands where it takes place with a group of interesting characters I will enjoy following into future books' Word Dreams (blog) 'An engaging, poetic and twist-filled Caribbean crime-noir novel. Masterful' Book Witty (blog)

Running Press Adult

The Girl

Michelle Morgan
Authors:
Michelle Morgan

When Marilyn Monroe stepped over a subway grating as The Girl in The Seven Year Itch and let a gust of wind catch the skirt of her pleated white dress, an icon was born. Before that, the actress was mainly known for a nude calendar and one-dimensional, albeit memorable, characters on the screen. Though she again played a "dumb blonde" in this film and was making headlines by revealing her enviable anatomy, the star was now every bit in control of her image, and ready for a personal revolution.Emboldened by her winning fight to land the role of The Girl, the making of The Seven Year Itchand the eighteen months that followed was the period of greatest confidence, liberation, and career success that Monroe lived in her tumultuous life. It was a time in which, among other things, she:* Ended her marriage to Joe DiMaggio and later began a relationship with Arthur Miller* Legally changed her name to Marilyn Monroe, divorcing herself from the troubled past of Norma Jeane* Started her own production company;Studied in private lessons with Lee and Paula Strasberg of the Actors Studio and became a part of the acting revolution of the dayThe ripple effects her personal rebellion had on Hollywood, and in trailblazing the way for women that followed, will both surprise and inspire readers to see the Marilyn Monroe in an entirely new light.

Running Press Kids

Someone Else's Summer

Rachel Bateman
Authors:
Rachel Bateman

For fans of Julie Halpern and Morgan Matson comes a summer road trip story about adventure, sisters, and finding out who you truly want to be. Anna's always idolized her older sister, Storm. So when Storm dies in a tragic car accident on the night of her high school graduation, Anna is completely lost and her family is torn apart. That is, until she finds Storm's summer bucket list and decides to honor her sister by having the best summer ever--which includes taking an epic road trip to the coast from her sleepy Iowa town. Setting out to do everything on Storm's list along with her sisters best friend Cameron--the boy next door--who knew that Storm's dream summer would eventually lead to Anna's own self-discovery?

Orbit

The Thousand Deaths of Ardor Benn

Tyler Whitesides
Authors:
Tyler Whitesides

Little, Brown Young Readers US

Gunslinger Girl

Lyndsay Ely
Authors:
Lyndsay Ely

James Patterson presents a genre-bending, action-packed debut -- and introduces YA's new favorite, kick-ass heroine: Serendipity Jones, the fastest sharpshooter in tomorrow's West. Seventeen-year-old Serendipity "Pity" Jones inherited two things from her mother: a pair of six shooters and perfect aim. When her father attempts to marry her off to a stranger, she runs away from their humble farming commune and ends up in the most dangerous, decadent city on the continent: Cessation (a lawless Las Vegas). Pity becomes the star of the Theater Vespertine as a trick sharpshooter like Annie Oakley, and there she finds fame, friendship and--what she most wanted--belonging. But there's a darker side to the Theater...The Finale. Every so often the fighting factions of Cessation have to be kept in line with a little demonstration, a nightmarish public execution. And Pity has a starring role...

Virago

The Feminist Revolution

Bonnie J. Morris, D. M. Withers
Authors:
Bonnie J. Morris, D. M. Withers

Oprah's book club has declared The Feminist Revolution a must-read for Women's History Month.The Feminist Revolution offers an overview of women's struggle for equal rights in the late twentieth century. Beginning with the auspicious founding of the National Organization for Women in 1966, at a time when women across the world were mobilizing individually and collectively in the fight to assert their independence and establish their rights in society, the book traces a path through political campaigns, protests, the formation of women's publishing houses and groundbreaking magazines, and other events that shaped women's history. It examines women's determination to free themselves from definition by male culture, wanting not only to 'take back the night' but also to reclaim their bodies, their minds, and their cultural identity. It demonstrates as well that the feminist revolution was enacted by women from all backgrounds, of every color, and of all ages and that it took place in the home, in workplaces, and on the streets of every major town and city. This sweeping overview of the key decades in the feminist revolution also brings together for the first time many of these women's own unpublished stories, which together offer tribute to the daring, humor, and creative spirit of its participants.

Corsair

A Moonless, Starless Sky

Alexis Okeowo
Authors:
Alexis Okeowo

'Absolutely essential reading, period' Alexandra Fuller, bestselling author of Don't Lets Go to the Dogs TonightWINNER of the 2018 PEN Open Book AwardIn the tradition of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, this is a masterful, humane work of literary journalism by New Yorker staff writer Alexis Okeowo - a vivid narrative of Africans who are courageously resisting their continent's wave of fundamentalism.In A Moonless, Starless Sky Okeowo weaves together four narratives that form a powerful tapestry of modern Africa: a young couple, kidnap victims of Joseph Kony's LRA; a Mauritanian waging a lonely campaign against modern-day slavery; a women's basketball team flourishing amid war-torn Somalia; and a vigilante who takes up arms against the extremist group Boko Haram. This debut book by one of America's most acclaimed young journalists illuminates the inner lives of ordinary people doing the extraordinary - lives that are too often hidden, underreported, or ignored by the rest of the world.

Virago

The Little Book of Feminist Saints

Julia Pierpont, Manjit Thapp
Contributors:
Julia Pierpont, Manjit Thapp
Robinson

Emily Hobhouse

Elsabé Brits
Authors:
Elsabé Brits

WINNER OF THE 2017 MBOKODO AWARD FOR WOMEN IN THE ARTS FOR LITERATURE.'Here was Emily . . . in these diaries and scrapbooks. An unprecedented, intimate angle on the real Emily'Elsabé Brits has drawn on a treasure trove of previously private sources, including Emily Hobhouse's diaries, scrap-books and numerous letters that she discovered in Canada, to write a revealing new biography of this remarkable Englishwoman. Hobhouse has been little celebrated in her own country, but she is still revered in South Africa, where she worked so courageously, selflessly and tirelessly to save lives and ameliorate the suffering of thousands of women and children interned in camps set up by British forces during the Anglo-Boer War, in which it is estimated that over 27,000 Boer women and children died; and where her ashes are enshrined in the National Women's Monument in Bloemfontein. During the First World War, Hobhouse was an ardent pacifist. She organised the writing, signing and publishing in January 1915 of the 'Open Christmas Letter' addressed 'To the Women of Germany and Austria'. In an attempt to initiate a peace process, she also secretly metwith the German foreign minister Gottlieb von Jagow in Berlin, for which some branded her a traitor. In the war's immediate aftermath she worked for the Save the Children Fund in Leipzig and Vienna, feeding daily for over a year thousands of children, who would otherwise have starved. She later started her own feeding scheme to alleviate ongoing famine.Despite having been instrumental in saving thousands of lives during two wars, Hobhouse died alone - spurned by her country, her friends and even some of her relatives. Brits brings Emily's inspirational and often astonishing story, spanning three continents, back into the light.

Robinson

A Woman Lived Here

Allison Vale
Authors:
Allison Vale

'A pretty awesome present for the feminist in your life' - Caroline Criado Perez, OBE, author of Do It Like a WomanAt the last count, the Blue Plaque Guide honours 903 Londoners, and a walking tour of these sites brings to life the London of a bygone era. But only 111 of these blue plaques commemorate women.Over the centuries, London has been home to thousands of truly remarkable women who have made significant and lasting impacts on every aspect of modern life: from politics and social reform, to the Arts, medicine, science, technology and sport. Many of those women went largely unnoticed, even during their own lifetimes, going about their lives quietly but with courage, conviction, skill and compassion. Others were fearless, strident trail-blazers. Many lived in an era when their achievements were given a male name, clouding the capabilities of women in any field outside of the home or field. A Woman Lived Here shines a spotlight on some of these forgotten women to redress the balance. The stories on these pages commemorate some of the most remarkable of London's women, who set out to make their world a little richer, and in doing so, left an indelible mark on ours.

Robinson

Slow Cooking: Best New Recipes

Annette Yates
Authors:
Annette Yates

You can cook far more than traditional soups and casseroles in your slow cooker. You can enjoy delicious dishes at any time of the day from lazy breakfasts to cool cakes. Whether you're feeding the family, entertaining friends or planning a small-scale meal for one or two, there's a recipe to suit the occasion in this revised edition of Annette Yates and Norma Miller's bestseller, originally entitled Fresh Ideas for Your Slow Cooker.Here's just a taste of the ingredients: Chocolate and Lime Pancakes; Courgette & Mushroom Frittata; Thai Curry Soup with Pork, Chilli & Lemon Grass; Trout & Fennel Pasta; Oriental Chicken with Egg Noodles; Tropical Fruit Pudding; Sticky Pineapple & Cinnamon Cake.Includes a quick-check index so you can select meals for the time you have available.

PublicAffairs

The Trade

Jere Van Dyk
Authors:
Jere Van Dyk

In 2008, American journalist Jere Van Dyk was kidnapped and held for 45 days. At the time, he had no idea who his kidnappers were. They demanded a ransom and the release of three of their comrades from Guantanamo, yet they hinted at their ties to Pakistan and to the Haqqani network, a uniquely powerful group that now holds the balance of power in large parts of Afghanistan and the tribal areas of Pakistan. After his release, Van Dyk wrote a book about his capture and what it took to survive in this most hostile of circumstances. Yet he never answered the fundamental questions that his kidnapping raised: Why was he taken? Why was he released? And who saved his life?Every kidnapping is a labyrinth in which the certainties of good and bad, light and dark are merged in the quiet dialogues and secret handshakes that accompany a release or a brutal fatality. In The Trade, Jere Van Dyk uses the sinuous path of his own kidnapping to explain the recent rise in the taking of Western hostages across the greater Middle East. He discovers that he was probably not taken by the anonymous "Taliban," as he thought, but by the very people who helped arrange his trip and then bargained for his release. It was not a matter of chance: CBS, Van Dyk's employer at the time, launched a secret rescue and, he learned later, paid an undisclosed ransom to a tribal chief who controlled the area in which he was kidnapped and who delivered him and his guide safely to a US Army base. In 2013, Van Dyk returned to the Middle East to unravel the links among jihadist groups, specifically that of the Haqqani network. His investigation finally paid off in 2015, when Van Dyk was taken to a discreet room in a guesthouse in Islamabad where he met Ibrahim Haqqani, part of the leadership of the Haqqani network who has been seen by very few outsiders since 9/11. There, Van Dyk learned of the Haqqanis' links to Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, the ISI, and the CIA and their involvement in the kidnapping of Bowe Bergdahl and many others. Back in the United States, Van Dyk saw the other side of the kidnapping labyrinth as he became involved with other former hostages and the families of recent kidnapping victims murdered by the Islamic State. Van Dyk's investigation shows how America's foreign policy strategy, the terrible cynicism of the kidnappers, and a world of shadowy interlocutors who play both sides of many bargains combine to create a brutal business out of the exchange of individual human lives for vast sums of money.

Virago

You Play The Girl

Carina Chocano
Authors:
Carina Chocano

We all know who The Girl is. She holds The Hero's hand as he runs through the Pyramids, chasing robots. Or she nags him, or foils him, plays the uptight straight man to his charming loser. She's idealised, degraded, dismissed, objectified and almost always dehumanised. How do we process these insidious portrayals, and how do they shape our sense of who we are and what we can become? Part memoir, part cultural commentary, part call to arms to women everywhere, You Play The Girl flips the perspective on the past thirty-five years in pop culture - from the progressive 70s, through the backlash 80s, the triumphalist 90s and the pornified 'bro culture' of the early twenty-first century - providing a firsthand chronicle of the experience of growing up inside this funhouse. Always incisive, Chocano brilliantly shows that our identities are more iterative than we think, and certainly more complex than anything we see on any kind of screen.

Corsair

Hunger

Roxane Gay
Authors:
Roxane Gay

'I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.'New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as "wildly undisciplined," Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties-including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life-and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life.With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen. Hunger is a deeply personal memoir from one of our finest writers, and tells a story that hasn't yet been told but needs to be.

Basic Books

Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris

Peter Brooks
Authors:
Peter Brooks

In 1869, Gustave Flaubert published what he considered to be his masterwork novel, A Sentimental Education, which told a deeply human and deeply pessimistic story of the 1848 revolutions. The book was a critical and commercial flop. Flaubert was devastated.

Robinson

How to Raise a Feminist

Allison Vale, Victoria Ralfs
Authors:
Allison Vale, Victoria Ralfs

'We are all equally fascinating, equally valuable, equally capable of altruism, equally able to change the world for the better. That's feminism, isn't it? And it's what every parent wants for their kids . . . every parent that's not a d*ck, that is.'Growing up in the '70s, neither Allison Vale nor Victoria Ralfs reckoned they needed feminism. But years of settling for the smallest chops at the dinner table, getting battered in British Bulldog, and negotiating the flasher down the lane, left them feeling uneasy: had feminism been the missing link?In How to Raise a Feminist, they join forces as mothers, educators, story-tellers and women, to tell the riotous story of how they came to put feminism at the core of their parenting.Real feminism is:· NOT angry or man-hating· common sense· the way to raise happily flawed, robust sons and daughtersReal parenting is:. mostly without a script. often a bit terrifying. entirely amazingHow to Raise a Feminist is the ideal read for anyone, anywhere, unnerved by the pressure to be perfect; a 'good enough' guide to raising your children into gloriously gutsy, empathetic, likeable young people, irrespective of their gender.