Rosalind Miles - Rebel Women - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Hardback £25.00
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    • ISBN:9780349006055
    • Publication date:01 Nov 2018
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    • ISBN:9780349006062
    • Publication date:01 Nov 2018

Rebel Women

All You Wanted to Know about Women's History from 1800 to the present day

By Rosalind Miles

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

All you ever wanted to know about women's history from the bestselling author. How far women have come! How far we - and men too - have yet to go. Exhilarating and inspiring for readers of all ages.

More than twenty-five years ago The Women's History of the World, by the brilliant historian, journalist and academic, Rosalind Miles, burst upon the world. It was instantly lauded and applauded by everyone from A.S. Byatt ('Witty, balanced, inexorable . . . and splendid') to the Washington Post ('an inspiration'). The book went on to be a longstanding Sunday Times bestseller, was translated into almost 40 foreign languages and became a New York Times bestseller.

Now it is time for Rebel Women: All you wanted to know about women's history from 1800 to the modern day. This is history as made by women: famous, infamous and little known, whose actions changed the course of the world.

We begin with the French Revolution when one woman took on the Fraternite of man, then it's off to America to round up the other rebels who paved the way, fighting side by side for freedom with their men. In Australia we celebrate a mass mooning by female convicts of Queen Victoria's Vice-Regent and his lady wife, and the dogged, often desperate courage of all the women who dared to think that they could change the world. Along the way we highlight the age-old cruelties and injustices suffered by women worldwide which the modern age has done little to challenge or change like forced marriage and femicide, while recording every milestone in the long march of women towards equality and the full life. In a colourful pageant of astonishing women, we track through to the birth of modern womanhood with the one small question of the Swinging Sixties which changed everything: Betty Friedan's "Is This all?" Women in space, women in jail, women in-skirts, women in burkas, women in power - all female life is there.

We end in the current day - breathless but thrilled with what women can and have and will do.

Brave, brilliant, unrivalled in its wit and erudition, Rebel Women is a hugely readable book.

Biographical Notes

Rosalind Miles is a graduate of Oxford University, has a doctorate from the Shakespeare Institute and is the author of 23 books of fiction and non-fiction.

Dr. Miles is the winner of the Network Award for outstanding achievement in the field of writing for women, and has been designated an Alien of Extraordinary Ability by the US Department of State.

She is Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts; Honorary Fellow of the University of Kent, and a founder contributor of The Literary Review, Working Woman UK and Prospect Magazine.

Translated into almost 40 foreign languages The Women's History of the World was a top ten bestseller in the UK and the US (Michael Joseph, UK, 1988; Salem House, US, 1989). It was awarded the non-fiction prize for the Best Foreign Title at the Gothenburg Book Fair, voted Best Book in its field by the American Historical Association and listed among the top 10 best-ever women's titles by the London Book Fair.

She is the author of the international best-seller, I, Elizabeth, a historical novel of Queen Elizabeth I in her own words.

She lives in Kent with her husband.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349006079
  • Publication date: 01 Nov 2018
  • Page count: 400
  • Imprint: Virago
Abacus

Coromandel

Charles Allen
Authors:
Charles Allen

COROMANDEL. A name which has been long applied by Europeans to the Northern Tamil Country, or (more comprehensively) to the eastern coast of the Peninsula of India.This is the India highly acclaimed historian Charles Allen visits in this fascinating book. Coromandel journeys south, exploring the less well known, often neglected and very different history and identity of the pre-Aryan Dravidian south. During Allen's exploration of the Indian south he meets local historians, gurus and politicians and with their help uncovers some extraordinary stories about the past. His sweeping narrative takes in the archaeology, religion, linguistics and anthropology of the region - and how these have influenced contemporary politics. Known for his vivid storytelling, for decades Allen has travelled the length and breadth of India, revealing the spirit of the sub-continent through its history and people. In Coromandel, he moves through modern-day India, discovering as much about the present as he does about the past.

Basic Books

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Authors:
Jay Sexton

Americans have long understood their history as a story of inevitable progress, of a steadily rising standard of living and of the gradual extension of rights and freedoms to previously disenfranchised groups. Thus recent developments-9/11, the 2008 financial crash, the election of Donald Trump-have arrived as great shocks, each seemingly a wrench in the gears of history. How are we to understand our nation's past from the perspective of our volatile present?With A Nation Forged by Crisis, Jay Sexton has written a concise history of America for our time. He contends that from the start our national narrative has been punctuated by underappreciated moments of disruption, and that the roots of these disruptions can be traced to shifts in the international system. Sexton shows that the Revolution was not the inevitable result of American exceptionalism, but a consequence of Atlantic integration. By the 1760s, immigration to the colonies had spiked, and among the new arrivals were people like Thomas Paine who brought radical ideas to the continent. While Sexton does not dispute that the Civil War was caused by slavery, he argues that a necessary precondition for the conflict was the absence, for the first time in decades, of foreign threats. Both North and South were emboldened-with horrific results. In a similar way, it is impossible to understand the emergence of the New Deal without examining the role of "white ethnics"-first and second generation Germans, Poles, and Irish-in transforming and overseeing the mid-century Democratic Party. Sexton closes by pointing out that if recent developments are any indication, the politics of the future appear set to look less like those of the twentieth century than those of the nineteenth century, which was dominated by questions of labor and race, markets and tariffs, immigration and citizenship, international rivalry and geopolitical instability.A razor-sharp and necessary revision of American history, A Nation Forged by Crisis forces us to reckon with the reality that the United States has been and will always be entwined with the world beyond its borders

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Authors:
Jeffry D. Wert

Before the Civil War, America had undergone a technological revolution that made large-scale industry possible, yet, except for the expanding reach of railroads and telegraph lines, the country remained largely rural, with only pockets of small manufacturing. Then the war came and woke the sleeping giant. The Civil War created a wave of unprecedented industrial growth and development, producing a revolution in new structures, ideas, and inventions that sustained the struggle and reshaped America.Energized by the country's dormant potential and wealth of natural resources, individuals of vision, organizational talent, and capital took advantage of the opportunity war provided. Their innovations sustained Union troops, affected military strategy and tactics, and made the killing fields even deadlier. Individually, these men came to dominate industry and amass great wealth and power; collectively, they helped save the Union and refashion the economic fabric of a nation.Utilizing extensive research in manuscript collections, company records, and contemporary newspapers, historian Jeffry D. Wert casts a revealing light on the individuals most responsible for bringing the United States into the modern age.

Da Capo Press

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Authors:
Flint Whitlock

The Allied landings at Anzio, on the Italian coast, six months before the Normandy invasion were intended as an "end run" around the stalemate that had developed in Italy. The planners hoped that the Allied invasion would surprise the Germans and threaten their defensive line in southern Europe. But the invasion stalled a few miles inland and the Allies faced a five-month bloody fight. In the end, American and British troops accomplished one of the great defensive stands of all time, turning defeat into victory.Using previously unpublished archival material, including memoirs from American, British, and German veterans, award-winning historian Flint Whitlock reveals the entire allied and German campaign, never forgetting the experiences of the soldiers in muddy, freezing, water-filled foxholes, struggling to hold off endless waves of infantry assaults, aerial bombardments, and artillery barrages.Desperate Valour is the first comprehensive account of the unrelenting slugfest at Anzio and a stirring chronicle of courage beyond measure.

Hachette Australia

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Authors:
Peter Phelps
Basic Books

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Basic Books

1619

James Horn
Authors:
James Horn
Robinson

Angels in the Trenches

Leo Ruickbie
Authors:
Leo Ruickbie

After a miraculous escape from the German military juggernaut in the small Belgian town of Mons in 1914, the first major battle that the British Expeditionary Force would face in the First World War, the British really believed that they were on the side of the angels. Indeed, after 1916, the number of spiritualist societies in the United Kingdom almost doubled, from 158 to 309. As Arthur Conan Doyle explained, 'The deaths occurring in almost every family in the land brought a sudden and concentrated interest in the life after death. People not only asked the question, "If a man die, shall he live again?" but they eagerly sought to know if communication was possible with the dear ones they had lost.' From the Angel of Mons to the popular boom in spiritualism as the horrors of industrialised warfare reaped their terrible harvest, the paranormal - and its use in propaganda - was one of the key aspects of the First World War.Angels in the Trenches takes us from defining moments, such as the Angel of Mons on the Front Line, to spirit communication on the Home Front, often involving the great and the good of the period, such as aristocrat Dame Edith Lyttelton, founder of the War Refugees Committee, and the physicist Sir Oliver Lodge, Principal of Birmingham University. We see here people at every level of society struggling to come to terms with the ferocity and terror of the war, and their own losses: soldiers looking for miracles on the battlefield; parents searching for lost sons in the séance room. It is a human story of people forced to look beyond the apparent certainties of the everyday - and this book follows them on that journey.

Hachette Audio

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Susan Fletcher
Authors:
Susan Fletcher

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PublicAffairs

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Juan Williams
Authors:
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Hachette Australia

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Da Capo Press

Adrift

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Authors:
Brian Murphy

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Hachette Australia

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Authors:
Tom Frame

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Virago

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