Pierre Hausherr and Francois Missen - Cuba (Revised) - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781579128548
    • Publication date:01 Jan 2011

Cuba (Revised)

The Sights, Sounds, Flavors, and Faces

By Pierre Hausherr and Francois Missen

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

The people, architecture, cuisine, and natural beauty of Cuba come to life in this gorgeous, one-of-a-kind tribute to this fascinating island country

The people, architecture, cuisine, and natural beauty of Cuba come to life in this gorgeous, one-of-a-kind tribute to this fascinating island country

This rich, visually stunning book gives a full and unprecedented look at the once forbidden island of Cuba. From the bustling city streets of Havana, to the rushing waterfalls of the lush, verdant countryside, to the fishing communities that dot miles of azure coastline, in Cuba an entire jewel of a country opens up to us as never before.

Large, full-color photographs adorn every page and showcase the landscapes, cityscapes, and seascapes, as well as the faces of the Cuban people. Organized by topic including: The Cuban Character, Havana, The Jungle and the Sea, Tastes of Cuba, Cuban Hospitality, Celebrations, and more, each chapter is framed by an introduction that offers some history and explains about Cuban culture as it exists today.

As the U.S. government begins to lift restrictions on travel, more and more Americans are becoming interested in visiting and learning about Cuba, bringing about an increased fascination with the island.

Biographical Notes

Pierre Hausherr studied photography at the Institut Francais de la Photographie before becoming a studio photographer.  In 1985 a trip to Mauritius changed the path of his career.  He became a specialist on islands and has contributed to Iles Magazine for over ten years.  He is very familiar with Cuba which he has visited and photographed many times.  He lives in France.Francois Missen is a Pulitzer Prize-winning independent investigativejournalist and the author of several books, both fiction and non-fiction.  He is also the winner of the Albert Londres Prize for journalism.  He lives in France.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780316511193
  • Publication date: 25 Jan 2018
  • Page count: 272
  • Imprint: Black Dog & Leventhal
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