A. M. Morgen - The Inventors at No. 8 - Little, Brown Book Group

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The Inventors at No. 8

By A. M. Morgen

  • Hardback
  • £12.99

A destitute orphan and a genius inventor set out on an epic quest to find a missing father and a priceless treasure in this captivating, fresh, and funny new fantasy adventure, perfect for fans of The Apothecaryand The Inquisitor's Tale.

Brimming with mystery and treasure, this action-packed tale sends a boy in need of luck and girl in need of a friend on an adventure that will change their lives forever.

Meet George, the third Lord of Devonshire and the unluckiest boy in London. Why is George so unlucky? First, he's an orphan. Second, unless he sells everything, he's about to lose his house. So when his family's last heirloom, a priceless map to the Star of Victory (a unique gem said to bring its owner success in any battle) is stolen by a nefarious group of criminals, George knows that there is no one less lucky--or more alone--than he is.

That is until Ada Byron, the future Countess of Lovelace, bursts into his life. She promises to help George recover his family legacy, and is determined to find her own father along the way--all in a flying machine she built herself. Joined by a mischievous orangutan and the long-lost son of an infamous pirate, Ada and George take off on a cross-continent journey through the skies that will change their lives, and perhaps the world, forever.

Biographical Notes

A.M. Morgen comes from a long line of engineers and researchers but chose to pursue literature over the laboratory. To her family's surprise, she has managed to make a decent living as an editor with her English degree. In her spare time, A.M. enjoys taking forest baths, trying out new hobbies (then abandoning them), and complaining about her mean cat. Despite what you may think, A.M. is not a morning person.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780316471497
  • Publication date: 12 Jul 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Little, Brown Young Readers US
Little, Brown Young Readers US

The Inventors and the Lost Island

A. M. Morgen
Authors:
A. M. Morgen

Ace Atkins

Ace Atkins is a former Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist who cut his teeth as a crime reporter in the newsroom of the Tampa Tribune. He published his first novel at the age of 27 and became a full-time novelist at 30. Ace lives on a historic farm outside Oxford, Mississippi with his family.

Alex Gray

Alex Gray was born and educated in Glasgow. After studying English and Philosophy at the University of Strathclyde, she worked as a visiting officer for the DHSS, a time she looks upon as postgraduate education since it proved a rich source of character studies. She then trained as a secondary school teacher of English. Alex began writing professionally in 1993 and had immediate success with short stories, articles and commissions for BBC radio programmes. She has been awarded the Scottish Association of Writers' Constable and Pitlochry trophies for her crime writing. A regular on the Scottish bestseller lists, her previous novels include Five Ways to Kill a Man, Glasgow Kiss, Pitch Black, The Riverman, Never Somewhere Else, The Swedish Girl and Keep the Midnight Out. She is the co-founder of the international Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, which had its inaugural year in 2012.

Andrew Martin

Andrew Martin is a journalist and novelist. His critically praised 'Jim Stringer' series began with The Necropolis Railway in 2002. The following titles in the series, Murder at Deviation Junction and Death on a Branch Line, were shortlisted for the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Crime Award and, in 2008, Andrew Martin was shortlisted for the CWA Dagger in the Library Award. The Somme Stations won the 2011 CWA Ellis Peters Historical Crime Award.

C. J. Daugherty

International bestselling author C. J. Daugherty is a former newspaper reporter and crime writer. Her Night School series has been translated into 21 languages, and has been the number 1 best selling young adult book in Germany, Poland, France, and Israel, topping charts in countries around the world.

Catherynne M. Valente

Catherynne M. Valente is the New York Times bestselling author of over two dozen works of fiction and poetry, including Palimpsest, the Orphan's Tales series, Deathless and the crowdfunded phenomenon The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making. She is the winner of the Andre Norton, Tiptree, Mythopoeic, Rhysling, Lambda, Locus and Hugo awards. She has been a finalist for the Nebula and World Fantasy Awards. She lives on an island off the coast of Maine with a small but growing menagerie of beasts, some of which are human.

Colin Wilson

Colin Wilson, renowned criminologist, TV and radio personality, is one of the most popular and respected writers on both criminology and psychology. He is the best-selling author of more than 60 books, including The Outsider, The Criminal History of Mankind, A Plague of Murder, The Mammoth Book of True Crime and many other works of non-fiction and fiction. He lives in Cornwall.

David Yallop

David Yallop is a highly regarded 'seeker of justice'; he has investigated, written and over-turned opinion with every book he has written. In 1983 he published In God's Name, which revealed the amazing truth behind the murder of John Paul I.

J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling is the author of the bestselling Harry Potter series of seven books, published between 1997 and 2007, which have sold over 450 million copies worldwide, are distributed in more than 200 territories, translated into 73 languages, and have been turned into eight blockbuster films. She has also written two small volumes, which appear as the titles of Harry's schoolbooks within the novels. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch Through the Ages were published by Bloomsbury Children's Books in March 2001 in aid of Comic Relief. In December 2008, The Tales of Beedle the Bard was published in aid of the Children's High Level Group, and quickly became the fastest selling book of the year.

Ken MacLeod

Ken MacLeod graduated with a BSc from Glasgow University in 1976. Following research at Brunel University, he worked in a variety of manual and clerical jobs whilst completing an MPhil thesis. He previously worked as a computer analyst/programmer in Edinburgh, but is now a full-time writer. He is the author of twelve previous novels, five of which have been nominated for the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and two which have won the BSFA Award. Ken MacLeod is married with two grown-up children and lives in West Lothian.

Mark Greaney

Mark Greaney is the bestselling author of four Gray Man titles, and also co-author of three books with Tom Clancy. A feature film adaptation of The Gray Man is in development by New Regency Pictures. Mark has a degree in International Relations and Political Science. To research his novels, Mark has travelled all over the world and trained with firearms, visited the Pentagon and multiple Washington, D.C. Intelligence agencies, and studied close quarters battle tactics and battlefield medicine. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee.

Maxim Jakubowski

Maxim Jakubowski is a British writer and editor who has been called the king of the erotic thriller and has edited five Mammoth volumes of erotica. He lives in northwest London.

Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved to New York when she was six, where she attended the Julia Richman High School and Barnard College. In her senior year she edited the college magazine, having decided at the age of sixteen to become a writer. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, was made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. The Talented Mr Ripley, published in 1955, introduced the fascinating anti-hero Tom Ripley, and was made into an Oscar-winning film in 1999 by Anthony Minghella. Graham Greene called Patricia Highsmith 'the poet of apprehension', saying that she 'created a world of her own - a world claustrophobic and irrational which we enter each time with a sense of personal danger' and The Times named her no.1 in their list of the greatest ever crime writers. Patricia Highsmith died in Locarno, Switzerland, in February 1995. Her last novel, Small g: A Summer Idyll, was published posthumously, the same year.

Peter Lovesey

Peter Lovesey was born in Middlesex and studied at Hampton Grammar School and Reading University, where he met his wife Jax. He won a competition with his first crime fiction novel, Wobble to Death, and has never looked back, with his numerous books winning and being shortlisted for nearly all the prizes in the international crime writing world. He was Chairman of the Crime Writers' Association and has been presented with Lifetime Achievement awards both in the UK and the US.

Rhys Bowen

Born in Bath, Somerset, Rhys Bowen now lives in San Rafael, California, with her husband. She is the author of many award-winning series including the Royal Spyness and Constable Evans mysteries. Constable is publishing her award-winning series of atmospheric historical dramas featuring feisty Irish immigrant Molly Murphy in old New York City.

Sean Wallace

SEAN WALLACE has been publishing fantasy fiction since 1997. In 2005, he launched Fantasy Magazine for which he won a World Fantasy Award. He has been nominated for numerous other World Fantasy Awards and, in 2009, a Hugo Award.

Shirley Barrett

Shirley Barrett is best known for her work as a screenwriter and director. Shirley's first film, Love Serenadewon the Camera D'Or (Best First Feature) at Cannes Film Festival in 1996. The script for her most recent filmSouth Solitary won the Queensland Premier's Prize (script) 2010, the West Australian Premier's Literary Prize (script) 2010, and the West Australian Premier's Prize 2010. RUSH OH! is Shirley's first novel. She lives in Sydney, Australia.

Slavomir Rawicz

SLAVOMIR RAWICZ was born in Pinsk in 1915. After his ordeal of The Long Walk he settled in England in 1944 were he remained for the rest of his life working in education. He died in 2004.

Steven Saylor

Steven Saylor writes murder mysteries and is best known for his Roma sub Rosa series set in Ancient Rome and featuring Gordianus the Finder.Steven has been a newspaper and magazine editor, and a literary agent. Steven was born in Texas in 1956 and graduated with high honors from the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied history and Classics. He divides his time between homes in Berkeley, California, and Austin, Texas.See also his website www.stevensaylor.com

Tasha Alexander

Tasha Alexander is the New York Times bestselling author of the Lady Emily series and the novel Elizabeth: The Golden Age. She attended the University of Notre Dame, where she studied English and Medieval History. Her work has been nominated for numerous awards and has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She and her husband, novelist Andrew Grant, divide their time between Chicago and the UK. Visit her online at www.tashaalexander.com