Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, and Brian Sullivan - Baseball's Best 1000 (Fourth Revised Edition) - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781579129088
    • Publication date:01 May 2012

Baseball's Best 1000 (Fourth Revised Edition)

Rankings of the Greatest Players of All Time

By Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, and Brian Sullivan

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

A revised and up-to-date edition of Baseball's Best 1,000, a must-have book for baseball fans obsessed with stats, quick facts, and the age-old debate of who is the best player in history and why.

Using various (and completely subjective) criteria including lifetime statistics, personal and professional contributions to the game at large, sportsmanship, character, popularity with the fans, and more, sports writer Derek Gentile ranks the best players of all time from 1 to 1,000.

The selection spans the generations from Edward "Cocky" Collins (1906-1930) to Miguel Cabrera (2003-present). Dozens of Negro league players are also included, as well as sidebars on the greatest Japanese players, women players, and "pre-historic" players from the time before stats and other information was formally recorded. Each entry includes the player's name, positions played, teams played for, and years played, as well as lifetime stats and a biography of the player including his great (and not-so-great) moments and little-known facts.

Baseball's Best 1,000 is sure to spark controversy and debate among fans.

Biographical Notes

Derek Gentile is a reporter for the Berkshire Eagle and is the baseball historian for Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He is the author of Smooth Moves and Baseball's Best 1,000, both published by Black Dog & Leventhal. He lives in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780316463874
  • Publication date: 27 Apr 2017
  • Page count: 672
  • Imprint: Black Dog & Leventhal
Hachette Books

My Dad, Yogi

Dale Berra, Mark Ribowsky
Authors:
Dale Berra, Mark Ribowsky

Everyone knows Yogi Berra, the American icon. He was the backbone of the New York Yankees through ten World Series Championships, managed the National League Champion New York Mets in 1973, and his inscrutable Yogi-isms remain an indelible part of our lexicon. But no one knew him like his family did. My Dad, Yogi is Dale Berra's story of his unshakeable bond with his father, as well as a unique and intimate perspective on one of the great sports figures of the 20th Century. When Yogi wasn't playing or coaching, or otherwise in the public eye, he was home in the New Jersey suburbs, spending time with his beloved wife, Carmen, and his three boys, Larry, Tim, and Dale. Dale chronicles--as only a son could--his family's history, his parents' enduring relationship, and his dad's storied career. Throughout Dale's youth, he had a firsthand look at the Major Leagues, often by his dad's side during Yogi's years as a coach and manager. Dale got to know players like Tom Seaver, Bud Harrelson, and Cleon Jones. Mickey Mantle, Don Larsen, and Phil Rizzuto were lifelong family friends. Dale and his brothers all became professional athletes, following in their dad's footsteps. Dale came up with a great Pittsburgh Pirates team, playing shortstop for several years before he was traded to the New York Yankees and briefly united with his dad. But there were extraordinary challenges. Dale was implicated in a major cocaine scandal involving some of the biggest names in the sport, and his promising career was cut short by his drug problem. Yogi supported his son all along, ultimately staging an intervention. Dale's life was saved by his father's love, and My Dad, Yogi is Dale's tribute, and a must-have for baseball fans and fathers and sons everywhere.

Back Bay

I'm Keith Hernandez

Keith Hernandez
Authors:
Keith Hernandez

Keith Hernandez revolutionized the role of first baseman. During his illustrious career with the World Series-winning St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets, he was a perennial fan favorite, earning eleven consecutive Gold Gloves, a National League co-MVP Award, and a batting title. But it was his unique blend of intelligence, humor, and talent--not to mention his unflappable leadership, playful antics, and competitive temperament--that transcended the sport and propelled him to a level of renown that few other athletes have achieved, including his memorable appearances on the television show Seinfeld.Now, with a striking mix of candor and self-reflection, Hernandez takes us along on his journey to baseball immortality. There are the hellacious bus rides and south-of-the-border escapades of his minor league years. His major league benchings, unending plate adjustments, and role in one of the most exciting batting races in history against Pete Rose. Indeed, from the Little League fields of Northern California to the dusty proving grounds of triple-A ball to the grand stages of Busch Stadium and beyond, I'm Keith Hernandez reveals as much about America's favorite pastime as it does about the man himself.What emerges is an honest and compelling assessment of the game's past, present, and future--a memoir that showcases one of baseball's most unique and experienced minds at his very best.

Hachette Books

Let's Play Two

Ron Rapoport
Authors:
Ron Rapoport

Ernie Banks, the first-ballot Hall of Famer and All-Century Team shortstop, played in fourteen All-Star Games, won two MVPs and a Gold Glove Award, and twice led the Major Leagues in home runs and runs batted in. His signature phrase, "Let's play two," has entered the American lexicon and exemplifies an enthusiasm and optimism that endeared him to fans everywhere.But Banks's public display of good cheer was also a mask that hid a deeply conflicted and complex man. He spent his entire career with the Chicago Cubs, who fielded some of baseball's worst teams, and became one of the greatest players never to reach the World Series. He endured poverty and racism as a young man, and the scorn of Cubs manager Leo Durocher as an aging superstar. Yet Banks smiled through it all, never complaining and never saying a negative word about his circumstances or the people around him.Based on numerous conversations with Banks, and on more than a hundred interviews with family, teammates, friends, and associates--as well as oral histories, court records, and thousands of other documents and sources--Let's Play Two tells Banks's story along with that of the woebegone Cubs teams he played for. This fascinating chronicle features Buck O'Neil, Philip K. Wrigley, the Bleacher Bums, the doomed pennant race of 1969, and much more from a long lost baseball era.

Little, Brown Young Readers US

The Lucky Baseball Bat

Matt Christopher, Robert Henneberger
Contributors:
Matt Christopher, Robert Henneberger

When Marvin moves to a new neighborhood, he wants nothing more than to make a good impression on his new teammates. After all, Marvin loves baseball more than anything, and all he wants is to prove he's worth his spot on the team. And with his lucky baseball bat in hand, what could go wrong?But when that same lucky baseball bat goes missing, Marvin completely loses his ability to play baseball. But even though he's lost his talent, Marvin might just find something else: the value of friendship, his own confidence, and maybe, just maybe, a place on the team.

Black Dog & Leventhal

Math with Bad Drawings

Ben Orlin
Authors:
Ben Orlin
Hachette Books

Baseball Cop

Eddie Dominguez, Christian Red, Teri Thompson
Authors:
Eddie Dominguez, Christian Red, Teri Thompson

Baseball Cop is the story of Eddie Dominguez, a decorated member of the Boston Police Department who worked for Major League Baseball first as a Resident Security Agent for the Boston Red Sox and then as an officer for the league's newly founded Department of Investigations (DOI).In the DOI, Dominguez had a unique view into the dark side of America's pastime, examining scandals involving drug use, age and ID fraud, human trafficking, and cover-ups. Now he is prepared to share the secrets that came across his desk every day for six years.As MLB disbanded DOI, it tried to control any information its investigators may have collected during their service. But Eddie Dominguez refused to fall in line and sign the Non-Disclosure Agreement given to the other DOI members who were terminated. As a result, every recollection in this book is thus his to freely tell, and can be substantiated by others.Baseball Cop will be written in alternating first-and-third-person chapters with Teri Thompson and Christian Red, co-authors of American Icon: The Fall of Roger Clemens and the Rise of Steroids in America's Pastime (Knopf: 2008).

Hachette Books

Hurricane Season

Joe Holley
Authors:
Joe Holley

On November 1, 2017, the Houston Astros defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in an epic seven game battle to become 2017 World Series champs. For the Astros, the combination of a magnificently played series, a 101-victory season and the devastation Hurricane Harvey brought to their city was so incredible it might give Hollywood screenwriters pause. The nation's fourth-largest city, still reeling in the wake of disaster, was smiling again.The Astros' first-ever World Series victory is a great baseball story, but it's also the story of a major American city - a city (and a state) that the rest of the nation doesn't always love or understand - becoming a sentimental favorite because of its grace and good will in response to the largest natural disaster in American history.The Astros' miracle season is also the fascinating tale of a thoroughly modern team. Constructed by NASA-inspired analytics, the team's data-driven system took the game to a more sophisticated level than the so-called Moneyball approach. The team's new owner, Jim Crane, bought into the system and was willing to endure humiliating seasons in the baseball wilderness with the hope, shared by few initially, that success comes to those who wait. And he was right.But no data-crunching could take credit for a team of likeable, refreshingly good-natured young men who wore "Houston Strong" patches on their jerseys and meant it-guys like shortstop Carlos Correa, who kept a photo in his locker of a Houston woman trudging through fetid water up to her knees. The Astros foundation included George Springer, a powerful slugger and rangy outfielder; third-baseman Alex Bregman, whose defensive play and clutch hitting were crucial in the series; and, of course, the stubby and tenacious second baseman José Altuve, the heart and soul of the team.HURRICANE SEASON is Houston Chronicle columnist Joe Holley's moving account of this extraordinary team-and the extraordinary circumstances of their championship.

Da Capo Lifelong Books

Ninety Percent Mental

Bob Tewksbury, Scott Miller
Authors:
Bob Tewksbury, Scott Miller

Former Major League pitcher and mental skills coach for two of baseball's legendary franchises (the Boston Red Sox and San Francisco Giants) Bob Tewksbury takes fans inside the psychology of baseball.In Ninety Percent Mental, Bob Tewksbury shows readers a side of the game only he can provide, given his singular background as both a longtime MLB pitcher and a mental skills coach for two of the sport's most fabled franchises, the Boston Red Sox and San Francisco Giants. Fans watching the game on television or even at the stadium don't have access to the mind games a pitcher must play in order to get through an at-bat, an inning, a game. Tewksbury explores the fascinating psychology behind baseball, such as how players use techniques of imagery, self-awareness, and strategic thinking to maximize performance, and how a pitcher's strategy changes throughout a game. He also offers an in-depth look into some of baseball's most monumental moments and intimate anecdotes from a "who's who" of the game, including legendary players who Tewksbury played with and against (such as Mark McGwire, Craig Biggio, and Greg Maddux), game-changing managers and executives (Joe Torre, Bruce Bochy, Brian Sabean), and current star players (Jon Lester, Anthony Rizzo, Andrew Miller, Rich Hill).With Tewksbury's esoteric knowledge as a thinking-fan's player and his expertise as a "baseball whisperer", this entertaining book is perfect for any fan who wants to see the game in a way he or she has never seen it before. Ninety Percent Mental will deliver an unprecedented look at the mound games and mind games of Major League Baseball.

Basic Books

The Heavens Might Crack

Jason Sokol
Authors:
Jason Sokol

Martin Luther King Jr today is an uncontroversial figure, and we tend to see him as a saint whose legacy is entirely uncomplicated. But in 1968, King was a polarizing figure, and his assassination was met with uncomfortably mixed reactions. At the time of his death, King was scorned by many white Americans, worshiped by a segment of African Americans and liberal whites, deemed irrelevant by the younger generation of African Americans, and beloved overseas. He was a hero to many. But to some, he was part of an old guard that was no longer relevant, and to others he was nothing more than a troublemaker and a threat to the Southern way of life. In The Heavens Might Crack, historian Jason Sokol traces the diverse range of reactions to King's death, exploring how Americans - as well as others across the globe--experienced King's assassination, in the days, weeks, and months afterward. He looks at everything from rioting in inner cities to turbulence in Germany, from celebrations in many parts of the South to the growing gun control movement. Across all these responses, we see one clear trend: with King gone and the cities exploding, it felt like a gear in the machinery of the universe had shifted. Just a few years prior, with the enactment of landmark civil rights laws, interracial harmony appeared conceivable; peaceful progress toward civil rights even seemed probable. In an instant, such optimism had vanished. For many, King's death extinguished that final flicker of hope for a multiracial America. With that hope gone, King's assassination would have an indelible impact on American sentiments about race, and the civil rights landscape.The Heavens Might Crack is a deeply empathetic portrait of country grappling with the death of a complicated man. By highlighting how this moment was perceived across the nation, Sokol reveals the enduring consequences King's assassination had for the shape of his own legacy, the course of the Civil Rights Movement, and race relations in America.

Black Dog & Leventhal

How Things Are Made

Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
Authors:
Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
Black Dog & Leventhal

Ingenious Patents (Revised)

Ben Ikenson, Jay Bennett
Authors:
Ben Ikenson, Jay Bennett

Discover some of the most innovative of the 6.5 million patents that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted since Thomas Jefferson issued the first one in 1790. Updated and reformatted from the original 2004 edition, Ingenious Patents presents each device along with background about the inventor, interesting sidebars and history, and an excerpt from the original patent application. Liberally sprinkled throughout are photos of original models and patent diagrams created by the inventors themselves and annotated to show exactly how each item works.Entries include creative commercial successes in fields as diverse as medicine, aeronautics, computing, agriculture, and consumer goods. Readers are certain to find a topic of interest here, whether it is the history behind the patent for a Pez dispenser, cathode ray tube, kitty litter, DNA fingerprinting, or the design of a Fender Stratocaster guitar.

Hachette Books

Teammate

David Ross, Don Yaeger
Authors:
David Ross, Don Yaeger
Hachette Books

Teammate

David Ross, Don Yaeger
Authors:
David Ross, Don Yaeger
Robinson

Superstition and Science

Derek Wilson
Authors:
Derek Wilson

'A dazzling chronicle, a bracing challenge to modernity's smug assumptions' - Bryce Christensen, Booklist'O what a world of profit and delightOf power, of honour and omnipotenceIs promised to the studious artisan.'Christopher Marlowe, Dr FaustusBetween the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, Europe changed out of all recognition and particularly transformative were the ardent quest for knowledge and the astounding discoveries and inventions which resulted from it. The movement of blood round the body; the movement of the earth round the sun; the velocity of falling objects (and, indeed, why objects fall) - these and numerous other mysteries had been solved by scholars in earnest pursuit of scientia. Several keys were on offer to thinkers seeking to unlock the portal of the unknown:Folk religion had roots deep in the pagan past. Its devotees sought the aid of spirits. They had stores of ancient wisdom, particularly relating to herbal remedies. Theirs was the world of wise women, witches, necromancers, potions and incantations.Catholicism had its own magic and its own wisdom. Dogma was enshrined in the collective wisdom of the doctors of the church and the rigid scholastic system of teaching. Magic resided in the ranks of departed saints and the priestly miracle of the mass.Alchemy was at root a desire to understand and to exploit the material world. Practitioners studied the properties of natural substances. A whole system of knowledge was built on the theory of the four humours.Astrology was based on the belief that human affairs were controlled by the movement of heavenly bodies. Belief in the casting of horoscopes was almost universal.Natural Philosophy really began with Francis Bacon and his empirical method. It was the beginning of science 'proper' because it was based on observation and not on predetermined theory.Classical Studies. University teaching was based on the quadrivium - which consisted largely of rote learning the philosophy and science current in the classical world (Plato, Aristotle, Galen, Ptolemy, etc.). Renaissance scholars reappraised these sources of knowledge.Islamic and Jewish Traditions. The twelfth-century polymath, Averroes, has been called 'the father of secular thought' because of his landmark treatises on astronomy, physics and medicine. Jewish scholars and mystics introduced the esoteric disciplines of the Kabbalah.New Discoveries. Exploration connected Europeans with other peoples and cultures hitherto unknown, changed concepts about the nature of the planet, and led to the development of navigational skills.These 'sciences' were not entirely self-contained. For example physicians and theologians both believed in the casting of horoscopes. Despite popular myth (which developed 200 years later), there was no perceived hostility between faith and reason. Virtually all scientists and philosophers before the Enlightenment worked, or tried to work, within the traditional religious framework. Paracelsus, Descartes, Newton, Boyle and their compeers proceeded on the a príori notion that the universe was governed by rational laws, laid down by a rational God.. This certainly did not mean that there were no conflicts between the upholders of different types of knowledge. Dr Dee's neighbours destroyed his laboratory because they believed he was in league with the devil. Galileo famously had his run-in with the Curia.By the mid-seventeenth century 'science mania' had set in; the quest for knowledge had become a pursuit of cultured gentlemen. In 1663 The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge received its charter. Three years later the French Academy of Sciences was founded. Most other European capitals were not slow to follow suit. In 1725 we encounter the first use of the word 'science' meaning 'a branch of study concerned either with a connected body of demonstrated truths or with observed facts systematically classified'. Yet, it was only nine years since the last witch had been executed in Britain - a reminder that, although the relationship of people to their environment was changing profoundly, deep-rooted fears and attitudes remained strong.

Black Dog & Leventhal

New York Times Story of the Yankees

Dave Anderson
Authors:
Dave Anderson
Abacus

Holden On Hold'em

Anthony Holden
Authors:
Anthony Holden

Holden is an experienced poker player who does not pretend to be as expert as the world's top pros; but he can write better than them - and he knows most well enough to milk them for personalized advice, tips and subtle strategies. HOLDEN ON HOLD'EM thoroughly analyses the difference between home and casino play, between cash and tournament play, between internet poker and the real thing against real human beings. Amid definitive charts and tables of odds, probabilities and other statistics, sample hands, advice on etiquette and other niceties, there will be sections on bluff, tells and the nuances of 'position' and 'outs', as well as a brief history of the game and anecdotes about its great players. This book can claim to be the first really readable manual in the history of poker! An entertaining, anecdote-packed and invaluable companion to the narrative poker classics BIG DEAL and BIGGER DEAL.

Sphere

The Official Candy Crush Top Tips Guide

Candy Crush
Authors:
Candy Crush

For anyone that has jumped for joy after clearing that tricky level, battled the bothersome Chocolate, or did a happy-dance when they created a Colour Bomb; this is the guide for you.From the team behind one of the most successful casual gaming brands of its time, Candy Crush SagaT, this comprehensive guide offers readers an in-depth insight into the Candy Kingdom and Dreamworld, including mastering the mechanics of the game, plus exclusive tips and strategies for clearing the most challenging of levels. It's Delicious!

Piatkus

How Not To Write

Terence Denman
Authors:
Terence Denman
Black Dog & Leventhal

A History Of Baseball In 100 Objects

Josh Leventhal
Authors:
Josh Leventhal

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Robinson

Mammoth Book Of The World Cup

Nick Holt
Authors:
Nick Holt

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