Therese Oneill - Unmentionable - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780316357913
    • Publication date:24 Nov 2016

Unmentionable

The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners

By Therese Oneill

  • Paperback
  • £12.99

Have you ever wished you could live in an earlier, more romantic era?

Have you ever wished you could live in an earlier, more romantic era?

Ladies, welcome to the 19th century, where there's arsenic in your face cream, a pot of cold pee sits under your bed, and all of your underwear is crotchless. (Why? Shush, dear. A lady doesn't question.)

UNMENTIONABLE is your hilarious, illustrated, scandalously honest (yet never crass) guide to the secrets of Victorian womanhood, giving you detailed advice on:

~ What to wear
~ Where to relieve yourself
~ How to conceal your loathsome addiction to menstruating
~ What to expect on your wedding night
~ How to be the perfect Victorian wife
~ Why masturbating will kill you
~ And more

Irresistibly charming, laugh-out-loud funny, and featuring nearly 200 images from Victorian publications, UNMENTIONABLE will inspire a whole new level of respect for Elizabeth Bennett, Scarlet O'Hara, Jane Eyre, and all of our great, great grandmothers.

(And it just might leave you feeling ecstaticallygrateful to live in an age of pants, super absorbency tampons, epidurals, anti-depressants, and not-dying-of-the-syphilis-your-husband-brought-home.)

Biographical Notes

Therese Oneill lives in Oregon and writes humor and rare history articles for many different popular outlets, including Mental Floss, The Week, The Atlantic, andJezebel. She lives with her husband and children near Portland. She can be found online atwww.writerthereseoneill.com where she runs a popular history and narrative blog.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780316357906
  • Publication date: 31 May 2018
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Back Bay
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