Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors Published by Little, Brown Book Group

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Yasmin Hai

Yasmin Hai was born in North London in 1970 where she continues to live. She is a current affairs journalist and documentary producer/director. Her television work includes BBC's Newsnight programme as well as award winning documentaries for Channel 4.
Radclyffe Hall

Marguerite Radclyffe-Hall (1883-1943) was born in Hampshire and educated at King's College Cambridge. She published five volumes of poetry and seven novels. THE WELL OF LONELINESS, describing the lesbian 'invert' Stephen, was banned on publication in 1928. Two years later she received the Eichelbergher Humane Award.
Helene Hanff

Helene Hanff wrote letters all her life as well as being the author of many books for children and articles for the NEW YORKER and HARPER'S. She died in 1997.
Michele Hanson

Michele Hanson is an author and Guardian columnist. Her memoir, What the Grown-ups Were Doing, is published by Simon & Schuster
Rebecca Harrington

Rebecca Harrington read English at Harvard, Journalism at Columbia and now works as a staff writer for the Huffington Post. An anglophile, she regularly visits the UK but is currently based in New York.
Josephine Hart

Josephine Hart (1942-2011) was the bestselling author of Damage, Sin, Oblivion and The Reconstructionist. She was a Director of Haymarket Publishing and founded Gallery Poets before going on to produce a number of West End plays. As well writing novels, she was a `poetry evangelist' and her Josephine Hart Poetry Hour at the British Library inspired two edited poetry books: Catching Life By the Throat and Words that Burn. She was married to Maurice Saatchi and had two sons.
Bessie Head

Bessie Head (1937-1986) is one of Africa's most prominent writers. In her short life, she left an important literary legacy to Africa and the world. Head was born in South Africa but spent much of her life in Botswana. Her works were mostly inspired by her own traumatic life experiences as an outcast in Apartheid South African society.
Marilyn Heward Mills

Marilyn Heward Mills was brought up in Ghana, the daughter of a Ghanaian father and Swiss mother. Cloth Girl is her first novel.
Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved to New York when she was six, where she attended the Julia Richman High School and Barnard College. In her senior year she edited the college magazine, having decided at the age of sixteen to become a writer. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, was made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. The Talented Mr Ripley, published in 1955, introduced the fascinating anti-hero Tom Ripley, and was made into an Oscar-winning film in 1999 by Anthony Minghella. Graham Greene called Patricia Highsmith 'the poet of apprehension', saying that she 'created a world of her own - a world claustrophobic and irrational which we enter each time with a sense of personal danger' and The Times named her no.1 in their list of the greatest ever crime writers. Patricia Highsmith died in Locarno, Switzerland, in February 1995. Her last novel, Small g: A Summer Idyll, was published posthumously, the same year.
Marjorie Hillis

Marjorie Hillis (1889-1971) worked for Vogue for over twenty years, where she became assistant editor. She was one of a growing number of independent, professional women who lived alone by choice. In 1936 she wrote LIVE ALONE AND LIKE IT (9781844081257), the superlative guide for 'bachelor ladies' (who became known as 'live-aloners'). It was an instant bestseller.
Joanna Hodgkin

Joanna Hodgkin has written several successful psychologial thrillers under another name.
Tom Holland

Tom Holland received a double first from Cambridge. He has adapted Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides and Virgil for BBC Radio. His scholarly style is pefect to reposition him as a writer of non-fiction as well as fiction.
Michael Holroyd

Michael Holroyd is the author of numerous biographies including Lytton Strachey, Augustus John, George Bernard Shaw and BASIL STREET BLUES, his family autobiography, garnered 50% more end-of-year critics' choices than any other work of non-fiction that year.
Winifred Holtby

Winifred Holtby (1898-1935), journalist, critic, feminist, pacifist and author won the James Tait Black Memorial prize with South Riding, her last novel.
Catherine Horwood

Catherine Horwood is honorary research fellow of the Bedford Centre for the History of Women at Royal Holloway and is about to be a visiting fellow at Yale. She has won many prizes for her own gardens and was an honorary assistant organiser of the National Gardens Scheme for London.
Zora Neale Hurston

In the Harlem Renaissance of the 1930s, Zora Neale Hurston was the preeminent black woman writer in the United States. She died in 1960 in a Welfare home, was buried in an unmarked grave, and quickly faded from literary consciousness until 1975 when Alice Walker almost single-handedly revived interest in her work. Nearly every black woman writer of significance - including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker - acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as their literary foremother.
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