Marcus Berkmann - Little, Brown Book Group

Marcus Berkmann



Marcus Berkmann has spent more than thirty years sitting in front of various television screens swearing at incompetent England batsmen. In his leisure time he has written columns on sport for Punch, the Independent on Sunday and the Daily Express. He is a regular contributor to Private Eye and has been the Spectator's pop music critic for over twenty years. His books include Rain Men: The Madness of Cricket, Zimmer Men: The Trials and Tribulations of the Ageing Cricketer, Fatherhood: The Truth and A Matter of Facts: The Insider's Guide to Quizzing
Little, Brown

Berkmann's Cricketing Miscellany

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann

Marcus Berkmann, author of the cricket classics Rain Men and Zimmer Men, returns to the great game with this gallimaufrey of cricketing trivia, stories and fascinating facts. Which England captain smoked two million cigarettes in his lifetime? Which Australian captain, asked what his favourite animal was, said 'Merv Hughes'? Who was the last person alive who had seen W. G. Grace bat? Which former National Hunt jockey had a dog called Sobers? Who was described in his obituary as 'perhaps the only unequivocally popular man in Yorkshire'?No other sport is so steeped in oddness and eccentricity. Within these pages are brief and pithy character portraits of the game's great and good, and more cricketers' nicknames than you will ever need. There's the only Test player ever to be executed for murder, the only first class cricketer to die on the Titanic, and the only bestselling author to catch fire while playing at Lord's. (It was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The ball hit a box of matches in his pocket.) All cricket is here, including an XI entirely made up of players who share their names with freshwater fish.

Abacus

The Amazing Test Match Crime

Adrian Alington
Authors:
Adrian Alington

The best cricket novel ever written . . .Before 'Sandpapergate' there was The Amazing Test Match Crime.'Cricket is the great narrative sport, and a close, hard-fought Test Match is the nearest any sport comes to the structure, rhythm and feel of a good novel. The opening is there, if someone is brave enough to take it . . .' Marcus BerkmannEngland are due to play Australia Imperia (names have been changed for legal reasons) at the Oval, in the final Test of the summer.The series hangs in the balance when England's Captain and star player disappears without trace . . .A wonderful novel which reads like a cross between an episode of Blackadder and England, Their England.

Little, Brown

The Spectator Book of Wit, Humour and Mischief

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann

Approaching its 200th birthday in the rudest of health, the Spectator is known for the quality of its writing and the deep eccentricity of some of its writers. Given the freedom to say what they want, they take that freedom and more, and the result is original, provocative, often very funny, sometimes plain wrong. From Jeffrey Bernard's reports from the Soho frontline and Auberon Waugh fulminating about hamburger gases in the early 1990s, we encounter in turn the wild stream of consciousness of Deborah Ross's restaurant reviews, the pinpoint etiquette advice of Mary Killen, Rod Liddle's frothing but elegantly sculpted outrage and the magazine's secret weapon, low life adventurer Jeremy Clarke. This bumper selection, which also includes eminent diarists, mad letter-writers and Boris Johnson, amounts to a masterclass in comic writing, lovingly compiled and edited by Marcus Berkmann, who still can't believe he wrote a monthly pop column for the magazine for twenty-eight years without being fired.

Little, Brown

Set Phasers to Stun

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann
Abacus

A Shed Of One's Own

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann

For many men, middle age arrives too fast and without due warning. One day you are young, free and single; the next you are bald, fat and washed-up, with weird tendrils of hair growing out of your ears. None of it seems fair. With age should come dignity and respect, but instead everyone makes tired jokes about buying a motorbike.Marcus Berkmann isn't having it. Having marked his fiftieth birthday by hiding under the duvet for six weeks, the author of the cricket classics Rain Men and Zimmer Men is now determined to find some light in the all-consuming darkness. Musing over birth, death and all the messy stuff in between, he concludes that however dreadful you look in the mirror today, it will be much worse in ten years' time. His brutally candid despatch from the frontline is not for the faint-hearted, which is to say anyone under thirty-five.

Abacus

A Matter Of Facts: The Insider's Guide To Quizzing

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann

Marcus Berkmann is a competitive obsessive but where he was very bad at cricket (see RAIN MEN) he's a brilliantly knowledgeable nerd and a great success at pub quizzes. He's possibly the only man in Britain whom Nick Hornby is jealous of - because his team beat Hornby's in a pub quiz and went on to win the EVENING STANDARD knockout tournament.This hilarious book will do for quiz culture - from Mastermind to Fifteen to One to the quiz in your local - what LOST IN MUSIC did for bad rock bands. Thousands of people take part in quizzes every week answering questions such as who won the League Cup in 1972 (Stoke City beat Chelsea 3-2) and which of Henry VIII's wives was both a widow and a virgin when she married him (Catherine of Aragon)?Funny, informative, original: this book has all the answers - including the one to question six.

Abacus

Ashes To Ashes

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann
Abacus

Zimmer Men

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann
Abacus

Rain Men

Marcus Berkmann
Authors:
Marcus Berkmann

There are many cricket books, and they are all the same. 'Don't Tell Goochie', autobiographical insights of nights on the tiles in Delhi with Lambie and the boys; 'Fruit cake days', a celebrated humourist recalls 'ball' - related banter of yore; and Wisden, a deadly weapon when combined with a thermos flask. Rain Men is different. Like the moment the genius of Richie Benaud first revealed itself to you, it is a cricketing epiphany, a landmark in the literature of the game.Shining the light meter of reason into cricket's incomparable madness, Marcus Berkmann illuminates all the obsessions and disappointments that the dedicated fan and pathologically hopeful clubman suffers year after year - the ritual humiliation of England's middle order, the partially-sighted umpires, the battling average that reads more like a shoe size. As satisfying as a perfectly timed cover drive, and rather easier to come by, Rain Men offers essential justification for anyone who has ever run a team-mate out on purpose or secretly blubbed at a video of Botham's Ashes.