David Brin - Little, Brown Book Group

David Brin



David Brin is the acclaimed Hugo and Nebula award-winning author of ten novels and two collections of short stories. He has a doctorate in astrophysics, and has been a consultant to NASA and a graduate-level physics professor. He lives in California.
Orbit

Exiles

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Uplift

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

WINNER OF THE HUGO, LOCUS AND NEBULA AWARDSUnder the caverns of Mercury, the Sundiver Mission prepares for a momentous voyage: a journey into the blazing inferno of the sun, to seek our destiny in the cosmic order of life.For in a universe where no species can reach sentience without being 'uplifted' by a patron race, only humanity - it seems - may have climbed to the stars unaided. This is a feat that puzzles and even angers some of the ancient, mighty Galactic Clans.Now, in a saga that warps from Earth to the far-reaches of five galaxies, the greatest mystery of all may be explained . . .This omnibus contains the first three novels in David Brin's classic and award-winning science fiction series, the Uplift Saga: SUNDIVER, STARTIDE RISING and THE UPLIFT WAR.

Orbit

Existence

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Otherness

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Startide Rising

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

The second in the Uplift series and winner of the Hugo and Nebula award, this novel describes how a spaceship crew of dolphins and a genetically engineered human find an ancient fleet and cadaver. They must fight to carry their prize of knowledge and power back to Earth.

Orbit

The Uplift War

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

As galactic armadas clash in quest of the ancient fleet of the Progenitors, a brutal alien race seizes the dying planet of Garth. The various uplifted inhabitants must battle their overlords of face ultimate extinction. At stake is the existence of Terran society and Earth and the fate of the entire Five Galaxies.THE UPLIFT WAR is the third book in David Brin's magnificent Uplift series. Winner of the Hugo award when it was first published, it is a sweeping, brilliantly crafted story of adventure and wonder from one of the greatest writers of science fiction.

Orbit

Sundiver

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Glory Season

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Foundation's Triumph

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

As for me, I am finished.' With these words, a frail, dying Hari Seldon completes his life's work. The old man has just recorded messages for the Time Vault of the First Foundation. Psychohistory's Seldon Plan is unleashed, propelled by the ponderous momentum of destiny. Younger hands will now take up the task. For the first time in his life, Seldon is no longer watched, nurtured and guided by robots and he retires to a corner of the Imperial Park to garden. The Seldon plan has three possible outcomes. None of them fills him with joy but he is consoled by the thought that any of the three is better than the chaos that would have happened without him. But the future still holds some surprises for Hari Seldon...

Orbit

Earth

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Heaven's Reach

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Kil'n People

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Brightness Reef

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

The Postman

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin
Orbit

Infinity's Shore

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

The second book in David Brin's second Uplift trilogy is a magnificent addition to one of science fiction's most ambitious and compelling series. The six races had been living in exile on the planet Jijo for two thousand years before they were discovered by the Five Galaxies. Now they are alone again, but they know it is only a reprieve . . . Fleeing across space following an alien attack on Earth, the spaceship Streaker finds itself stranded near an uninhabited planet. Kaa is sent to the surface to investigate. All seems quiet. He doesn't yet know that the planet is Jijo.

Basic Books

The Transparent Society

David Brin
Authors:
David Brin

In New York and Baltimore, police cameras scan public areas twenty-four hours a day. Huge commercial databases track you finances and sell that information to anyone willing to pay. Host sites on the World Wide Web record every page you view, and smart" toll roads know where you drive. Every day, new technology nibbles at our privacy.Does that make you nervous? David Brin is worried, but not just about privacy. He fears that society will overreact to these technologies by restricting the flow of information, frantically enforcing a reign of secrecy. Such measures, he warns, won't really preserve our privacy. Governments, the wealthy, criminals, and the techno-elite will still find ways to watch us. But we'll have fewer ways to watch them. We'll lose the key to a free society: accountability. The Transparent Society is a call for reciprocal transparency." If police cameras watch us, shouldn't we be able to watch police stations? If credit bureaus sell our data, shouldn't we know who buys it? Rather than cling to an illusion of anonymity-a historical anomaly, given our origins in close-knit villages-we should focus on guarding the most important forms of privacy and preserving mutual accountability. The biggest threat to our freedom, Brin warns, is that surveillance technology will be used by too few people, now by too many.A society of glass houses may seem too fragile. Fearing technology-aided crime, governments seek to restrict online anonymity fearing technology-aided tyranny, citizens call for encrypting all data. Brins shows how, contrary to both approaches, windows offer us much better protection than walls after all, the strongest deterrent against snooping has always been the fear of being spotted. Furthermore, Brin argues, Western culture now encourages eccentricity-we're programmed to rebel! That gives our society a natural protection against error and wrong-doing, like a body's immune system. But social T-cells" need openness to spot trouble and get the word out. The Transparent Society is full of such provocative and far-reaching analysis.The inescapable rush of technology is forcing us to make new choices about how we want to live. This daring book reminds us that an open society is more robust and flexible than one where secrecy reigns. In an era of gnat-sized cameras, universal databases, and clothes-penetrating radar, it will be more vital than ever for us to be able to watch the watchers. With reciprocal transparency we can detect dangers early and expose wrong-doers. We can gauge the credibility of pundits and politicians. We can share technological advances and news. But all of these benefits depend on the free, two-way flow of information.