Matthew Johnstone - Little, Brown Book Group

Matthew Johnstone



Matthew Johnstone is an artist, writer and exhibited photographer. New Zealand born, he worked in advertising in Sydney, San Francisco and New York. He now resides in
Sydney with his family. He and his wife, Ainsley, know all too well what it's like to live with a 'black dog' - Matthew has personally experienced the hell of depression, while Ainsley has first-hand knowledge of
the frustration and confusion almost always felt by those who care for a depressed person. Together they are uniquely
able to offer practical and helpful advice.

Coming Soon
Robinson

StressLess

Matthew Johnstone, Michael Player
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone, Michael Player

If you're alive, you experience stress. It's just part of being human. For early man, stress helped us flee danger like a marauding mammoth, a hungry sabre-toothed tiger or an invading tribe. It literally helped us fight or flight. In modern society a little stress is useful, it keeps us energised and motivated to get things done, it helps us to turn up and be on time. Yet too much stress is harmful, and stress is sadly, at an all-time high. Unfortunately, it's almost impossible to avoid or substantially reduce stress in our lives. The things that make us stressed are the same things that always have: too much work, not enough time, financial woes, family needs, navigating difficult relationships - these familiar scenarios aren't likely to change. So if we can't change the things that cause us stress, we must change the way we interact with it.When we feel threatened or endangered in any way, our body and mind react accordingly. Unfortunately, these days our brain sees many 'threats', even if they're not actually a danger to us. This 'stress' is a major problem and is now considered to be a major precipitating factor in almost all major diseases. Yet if we're prepared to learn from it, stress can be a useful teacher. Coping with moderate amounts of stress builds a sense of mastery and it promotes resilience for life down the road. Stressed spelled backwards is Desserts. With that in mind; through this beautifully illustrated book from illustrator and speaker Matthew Johnstone and experienced clinician Michael Player, the hope is to turn one of the most unpleasant of human experiences into a sweet one.

Robinson

The Little Book of Resilience

Matthew Johnstone
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone
Robinson

Capturing Mindfulness

Matthew Johnstone
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone

There are few better ways to consciously slow down and truly engage with your surroundings than when you are armed with a camera. With Capturing Mindfulness, de-stressing and being in the moment needn't be limited to simple diary-keeping and fill-in journals; instead you can capture it with your lens. Bestselling author Matthew Johnstone's latest book Capturing Mindfulness, is a natural follow on from his last book Quiet the Mind which came out in 2012.Matthew has been practicing what he terms 'photopresent' for the last 15 years and believes that next to meditation, this is one of the most creative and enjoyable ways to attain mindfulness in day-to-day life. The very essence of photography; after all, is all about focus and capturing 'the moment'.Matthew is fascinated by light, colour, composition and most importantly how he can see the world differently. For him, having camera in your hands is the reminder to consciously slow everything down from your breath, to your walk, to your thoughts and begin to really observe your surroundings as if seeing them for the first time.Mindfulness photography is about seeing something that no one else can, capturing something that will never happen again and finding beauty where it doesn't typically exist. When we become more consciously aware of where we are, what we're doing and what we're thinking, life can become calmer, more enjoyable and generally more manageable.

Robinson

The Alphabet of the Human Heart

Matthew Johnstone, James Kerr
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone, James Kerr

A handbook for the happy, and a bible for the broken-hearted, The Alphabet of the Human Heart is an enchanting and enriching journey through the upside and the downside of what it means to be human - our hopes and our fears, our strength and our weakness, our highs and our lows.The Alphabet of the Human Heart is a book of literally two halves. Firstly there is upside A-Z, which is full of the happy and hopeful aspects of our lives, such as A is for Adventure, through G is for Gratitude, S is for Smile to Zen is the Place to Be. The other downside half examines the negative parts of our character lives and how we can overcome them to lead more positive and fulfilling lives. From A is for Anger, through H is for Hate, T is for Temptation to once again end on Zen is the Place to be. Matthew and James have been friends for over 30 years and they've experienced both sides of life - the upside and the downside - and they've turned their experience of life - and of friendship - into a book that combines words and pictures to tell a bigger story.Praise for I Had a Black Dog:'I Had a Black Dog says with wit, insight, economy and complete understanding what other books take 300 pages to say. Brilliant and indispensable.' - Stephen Fry'Finally, a book about depression that isn't a prescriptive self-help manual. Johnston's deftly expresses how lonely and isolating depression can be for sufferers. Poignant and humorous in equal measure.' Sunday TimesPraise for Living with a Black Dog:'Moving and thoughtfully written ... a must-have' Daily Mirror'Comprehensive and very helpful ... brilliant' Guardian Weekend

Robinson

Quiet the Mind

Matthew Johnstone
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone
Robinson

Living with a Black Dog

Matthew Johnstone, Ainsley Johnstone
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone, Ainsley Johnstone
Robinson

I Had a Black Dog

Matthew Johnstone
Authors:
Matthew Johnstone

'I Had a Black Dog says with wit, insight, economy and complete understanding what other books take 300 pages to say. Brilliant and indispensable.' - Stephen Fry'Finally, a book about depression that isn't a prescriptive self-help manual. Johnston's deftly expresses how lonely and isolating depression can be for sufferers. Poignant and humorous in equal measure.' Sunday TimesThere are many different breeds of Black Dog affecting millions of people from all walks of life. The Black Dog is an equal opportunity mongrel.It was Winston Churchill who popularized the phrase Black Dog to describe the bouts of depression he experienced for much of his life.Matthew Johnstone, a sufferer himself, has written and illustrated this moving and uplifting insight into what it is like to have a Black Dog as a companion and how he learned to tame it and bring it to heel.