Paul Halpern - Little, Brown Book Group

Paul Halpern



Paul Halpern is a professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, and the author of fifteen popular science books, most recently Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat. He lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Basic Books

The Quantum Labyrinth

Paul Halpern
Authors:
Paul Halpern

In 1939, Richard Feynman, a brilliant graduate of MIT, arrived in John Wheeler's Princeton office to report for duty as his teaching assistant. A lifelong friendship and enormously productive collaboration was born, despite sharp differences in personality. The soft-spoken Wheeler, though conservative in appearance, was a raging nonconformist full of wild ideas about the universe. The boisterous Feynman was a cautious physicist who believed only what could be tested. Yet they were complementary spirits. Their collaboration led to a complete rethinking of the nature of time and reality. It enabled Feynman to show how quantum reality is a combination of alternative, contradictory possibilities, and inspired Wheeler to develop his landmark concept of wormholes, portals to the future and past. Together, Feynman and Wheeler made sure that quantum physics would never be the same again.

Basic Books

Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat

Paul Halpern
Authors:
Paul Halpern
Basic Books

The Cyclical Serpent

Paul Halpern
Authors:
Paul Halpern

A comparative overview of common images of the universe from world art and folklore and their similarities to our current scientific understanding.

Basic Books

The Quest For Alien Planets

Paul Halpern
Authors:
Paul Halpern

An amazing journey throughout the universe in a search for other planets and the possibility of extraterrestrial life.

Basic Books

Countdown To Apocalypse

Paul Halpern
Authors:
Paul Halpern

Inspired by the end of the millennium, celebrated science writer Paul Halpern tackles the fate of human civilization and our planet in this meditation on the end of the world. Beginning with the religious origins of the idea of apocalypse, Halpern shows how science has borrowed the metaphor to describe potential worldwide catastrophes. He spins out various scenarios for destruction, from nuclear war and global warming to a great flood and a new Ice Age. He argues that while human history will someday come to a close-even if we survived for billions of years, we would eventually face the end of the universe itself-in the meantime we have gained extraordinary control over our fate as a species. Faced with the power to steer our planet toward paradise or transform it into hell, he says, we must take steps to avoid those catalysts of apocalypse that are within our control.