Related to: 'The Mitford Girls'

Jessica Mitford

Jessica Mitford was the fifth of the six Mitford daughters and always the rebel among her sisters - Nancy, Pam, Diana, Unity and Debo. At the age of nineteen she eloped to the Spanish Civil War with her cousin, Esmond Romilly, and the two of them moved to the USA in 1939. Esmond Romilly died in action in 1941 and Jessica later married Bob Treuhaft, a lawyer, with whom she lived in California. A one-time member of the American Communist Party, Jessica was a frequent target for the House Committee of Un-American Activities and was a passionate supporter of civil rights.

Abacus

Straight On Till Morning

Mary S. Lovell

Beryl Markham, like Karen Blixen, could only have come out of Africa. Pioneering aviatrix, flamboyant beauty, brilliant race-horse trainer, unscrupulous seducer - her life story is for every reader who was enthralled by Blixen's exotic world, that of Kenya between the wars. This fully authorised biography, drawn from the author's personal association with Beryl and her family, paints a vivid portrait of a tempestuous and controversial character. It tells of her friendship with Karen Blixen (though she commandeered Blixen's husband Bror and lover Denys Finch Hatton), of her spectacular courage when she became the first person to fly from England to America, and of the mysteries surrounding her highly praised, bestselling book WEST WITH THE NIGHT.

Mary S. Lovell

Mary Lovell lists her chief interests as horses, sailing, aviation and book collecting. She enjoys overseas travel and is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. She is the author of four previous biographies including the international bestseller STRAIGHT ON TILL MORNING: The Biography of Beryl Markham.

Abacus

Amelia Earhart

Mary S. Lovell

When she disappeared in 1937 over a shark-infested sea, Amelia Earhart had lived up to her wish - internationally famous, a daring and pioneering aviator, and ambassador extraordinary for the United States. Married to a man with a genius for publicity, her life was crowded, demanding and adventurous. Mary S. Lovell's superb biography examines a legend to reveal the pressures and influences that drove Amelia, and shows how her life, career and manner of death foreshadowed the tragedies and excesses of a media-dominated age.

Abacus

A Rage To Live

Mary S. Lovell
Abacus

Bess Of Hardwick

Mary S. Lovell

Bess of Hardwick was one of the most remarkable women of the Tudor era. Gently-born in reduced circumstances, she was married at 15, wedded at 16 and still a virgin. At 19 she married a man more than twice her age, Sir William Cavendish, a senior auditor in King Henry VIII's Court of Augmentations. Responsible for seizing church properties for the crown during the Dissolution, Cavendish enriched himself in the process. During the reign of King Edward VI, Cavendish was the Treasurer to the boy king and sisters and he and Bess moved in the highest levels of society. They had a London home and built Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. After Cavendish's death her third husband was poisoned by his brother. Bess' 4th marriage to the patrician George, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, Earl Marshall of England, made Bess one of the most important women at court. Her shrewd business acumen was a byword and she was said to have 'a masculine understanding', in that age when women had little education and few legal rights. The Earl's death made her arguably the wealthiest and therefore - next to the Queen - the most powerful woman in the country.

Virago

West With The Night

Beryl Markham

WEST WITH THE NIGHT appeared on 13 bestseller lists on first publication in 1942. It tells the spellbinding story of Beryl Markham -- aviator, racehorse trainer, fascinating beauty -and her life in the Kenya of the 1920s and 30s. Markham was taken to Kenya at the age of four. As an adult she was befriended by Denys Finch-Hatton, the big-game hunter of OUT OF AFRICA fame, who took her flying in his airplane. Thrilled by the experience, Markham went on to become the first woman in Kenya to receive a commercial pilot's license. In 1936 she determined to fly solo across the Atlantic -- without stopping. When Charles Lindbergh did the same, he had the wind behind him. Markham, by contrast, had a strong headwind against her and a plane that only flew up to 163 mph. On 4 September, she took off ... Several days later, she crash-landed in Nova Scotia and became an instant celebrity.

Little, Brown

The Churchills

Mary S. Lovell

There never was a Churchill from John of Marlborough down who had either morals or principles', so said Gladstone. From the First Duke of Marlborough - soldier of genius, restless empire-builder and cuckolder of Charles II - onwards, the Churchills have been politicians, gamblers and profligates, heroes and womanisers. The Churchills is a richly layered portrait of an extraordinary set of men and women - grandly ambitious, regularly impecunious, impulsive, arrogant and brave. And towering above the Churchill clan is the figure of Winston - his failures and his triumphs shown in a new and revealing context - ultimately our 'greatest Briton'.

Virago

Hallelujah! The Welcome Table

Maya Angelou

Throughout Maya Angelou's life food has played a pivotal role at important moments. In HALLELUJAH! THE WELCOME TABLE she narrates some of these tales and then gives us recipes for the food that helped shape her memories. There was the time she cooked a cassoulet for M.F.K. Fisher on the very day she moved into her new house in California. Or how her mother made a delicious maple cake for her when she was expelled from school for not being able to speak. Then there's a story about how once Decca (Jessica) Mitford made a delicious chicken - and the recipe is for 'Chicken Drunkard Style'. The recipes cover fried meat pies, caramel cake, Minnisota wild rice, chicken livers and many more. Maya Angelou's kitchen is a social centre, she cooks while she entertains and is renowned for what she serves.

Constable

1938: Hitler's Gamble

Giles MacDonogh

In this masterly new work, acclaimed historian Giles MacDonogh explores the moment when Hitler gambled everything. Until 1938, Hitler could be dismissed as a ruthless but efficient dictator, a problem to Germany alone; after 1938 he was clearly a threat to the entire world. In that year The Third Reich came of age and the Führer showed his hand - bringing Germany into line with Nazi ideology and revealing long-held plans to take back those parts of Europe lost to 'Greater Germany' after the First World War. The sequence of events began in January with the purging of the army, and escalated with the merger with Austria - the Anschluss, and the first persecutions of Viennese Jewry. In the following months Hitler moulded the nation to his will. Elections brought him a 99 per cent approval rating. MacDonogh gives a full account of the nationalist opposition that failed to topple Hitler in September 1938. By the end of the year the brutal reality of the Nazi regime was revealed by Joseph Goebbels in Kristallnacht, a nationwide assault on Germany's native Jewish population. MacDonogh's access to many new sources gives insights into what life was like under the eye of the regime, revealing the role of the Anglican Church after the Anschluss, saving those Jews who were willing to convert, and also the Kendrick Affair - the still-secret details of the Austrian double agent who brought down the whole MI6 operation in Austria and Germany, just as the Chamberlain government began negotiations with Hitler at Munich. A remarkable and revealing account of Hitler's opening moves to war.

Robinson

Mammoth Books presents Missing Persons and Mysterious Deaths

Jon E. Lewis

Alexander Litvinenko Mr Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian living in London, was poisoned by Polonium-210, traced by alpha detectors to a British Airways flight from Moscow to Heathrow. A Champions League match between Arsenal and CKSA Moscow had brought thousands of Russian fans to London. Was one of them responsible for Litvinenko's death? American MIA in Vietnam Is it possible that prisoners of war still remain left behind in Vietnam? Chemtrails Polluted contrails that rain death and disease. Who would commit such a ruthless act? Christopher Marlowe Marlowe was a rake and a radical, a homosexual and an atheist, but what really happened to this notorious free-thinking Elizabethan in 1593? Diana, Princess of Wales Mohamed Al-Fayed, Harrod's owner and the man who might have become Diana's father-in-law, points the finger at Prince Phillip, the Queen's husband, an accusation which sparked a multi-million pound investigation. Dr David Kelly The UK scientist and weapons expert found dead just days after being identified as the source who cast doubt on the claim that Saddam Hussein could have fired a weapon of mass destruction at 45 minutes notice. Was it suicide, or murder? Elvis Presley Elvis is supposedly alive and well, and has been spotted countless times since his death in 1977. But Elvis fans inadvertently add to the hysteria by dressing like him - has anyone actually seen the real Elvis Presley? Gemstone File This 1,000 page document claims that a great deal of suppressed information has played a role in shaping world events since the 1950's. Do the mafia and other corrupt politicians have anything to do with the Kennedy assassinations and other major historical events? Hilda Murrell Did campaigner Hilda Murrell suffer a state-sponsored death because she knew too much? Or was this really just an unfortunate end to a botched burglary? HIV and Aids Was Human Immunodeficiency Virus deliberately engineered as part of a racist plot to reduce the world's population? John F. Kennedy Who was with Lee Harvey Oswald when he supposedly killed the US President? Jimmy Hoffa The ex-president of the US Teamsters Union ate a meal at Machus Red Fox restaurant in Detroit, paid for his meal and walked straight out straight into an American mythology. What happened to Jimmy Hoffa? John Lennon It seems clear that John Lennon's assassinator, Mark David Chapman, was simply a deranged fan, or is there some truth to the theory that he was actually a Manchurian Candidate, brainwashed and pre-programmed to kill on command? Karen Silkwood Labour union activist Karen Silkwood was allegedly murdered to prevent her blowing the whistle on the Kerr-McGee nuclear company. Malcolm X Hayer, Butler and Johnson were convicted of first-degree murder, but with all the evidence gathered, is it possible that the FBI set up Malcolm X for assassination by black radicals? Marilyn Monroe Her death may well have been assumed to have been a suicide if not for her long string of high-profile boyfriends. But if one of them killed her, which one was it? Martin Bormann Hitler's right hand man and head of the Nazi party Chancellery death has continued to cause controversy despite his supposed death in 1945. Bormann is said to have lived on after the war and stayed hidden from view, yet forensic identification documents state otherwise, so why do the conspiracy theories on Bormann persist? Martin Luther King To this day millions believe James Earl Ray did not have the capability to execute Martin Luther King alone, but is it true that Ray was merely a patsy? Montauk Point Supposedly a centre for research into exotic psychological welfare techniques, the Montauk project actually calls into question our whole experience of reality, truth and the universe. Norman Kirk The radical leader of the New Zealand Labour Party had begun a series of attacks on trilateralists, two years later he was found dead, quickly replaced by Wallace Rowling. Are those who think his sudden death from a heart attack just a bit too convenient right to suspect foul play? PROMIS Was conspiracy researcher Danny Casolaro silenced to stop his investigation into the theft of PROMIS software? Robert F Kennedy Palestinian immigrant Sirhan Sirhan, the man arrested for the assassination of Robert Kennedy, cannot have committed the crime alone. His gun held a mere eight bullets, yet Kennedy was shot eleven times. Robert Maxwell The corpse of British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell was found floating close to his yacht off the Canary Islands on the 5th of November 1991. Many people believe Maxwell's death is dubious, why then, was his family so happy to accept his accidental death? Rudolf Hess In 1941 Hitler's Deputy Fuhrer flew a stolen Me110 German fighter plane to Britain on what Hitler affirmed was a mad private 'peace mission', did Hitler approve of Hess's star-crossed plan? Or perhaps he was lured to Britain? Tupac Shakur Did Notorious BIG, fellow rap superstar contract the hit on rival Tupac Shakur, or is he alive and well living in Witness Protection? Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Mozart was supposedly killed by his rival composer Antonio Salieri, but not necessarily by cold-blooded physical murder. Some believed Salieri ordered Mozart to work himself to death by anonymously commissioning a requiem mass against an impossible deadline. But why then would his wife allow Salieri to teach their son music?

Virago

Circling the Sun

Paula McLain

As a young girl, Beryl Markham was brought to Kenya from Britain by parents dreaming of a new life. For her mother, the dream quickly turned sour, and she returned home; Beryl was brought up by her father, who switched between indulgence and heavy-handed authority, allowing her first to run wild on their farm, then incarcerating her in the classroom. The scourge of governesses and serial absconder from boarding school, by the age of sixteen Beryl had been catapulted into a disastrous marriage - but it was in facing up to this reality that she took charge of her own destiny. Scandalizing high society with her errant behaviour, she left her husband and became the first woman ever to hold a professional racehorse trainer's licence. After falling in with the notoriously hedonistic and gin-soaked Happy Valley set, Beryl soon became embroiled in a complex love triangle with the writer Karen Blixen and big game-hunter Denys Finch Hatton (immortalized in Blixen's memoir Out of Africa). It was this unhappy affair which set tragedy in motion, while awakening Beryl to her truest self, and to her fate: to fly.

Virago

On the Wilder Shores of Love

Lesley Blanch, Georgia de Chamberet
Abacus

Shadows Of Glory

William Woodruff

Woodruff's novel is about the fortunes of an Oxford University rowing eight, leading up to and during the Second World War. 1938: the Arnold College crew are a varied bunch, united only by the love of their sport and a sense that theirs is a generation which may have to fight for king and country. There's Charley Bradbury, a Scottish Communist and pacifist; David Evans, a chorister and super-boffin; Roger Blundell a witty dandy;Tony Markham, heir to a substantial estate and brother to four Mitford-type sisters; Pat Riley, charming somewhat mysterious Irishman; Alex Haverfield, handsome and a natural leader; Max Elsfield a dangerous self-destructive drinker and Bill Clark a naval cadet. As the war progresses they are gradually whittled away. Some, like Max Elsfield and David Evans, have been unhappy in love and have brought about their own destruction through reckless assaults on the enemy. Others like Charley Bradbury have had the bad luck to be in the wrong place at the wrong time - torpedoed on a passenger vessel from Russia. Ultimately this - like the Nab End stories - is a book about common humanity: the importance of virtues such as faith, loyalty and self-sacrifice.

Constable

What You Didn't Miss

D.J. Taylor
Robinson

The Fuhrer

Konrad Heiden

Journalist Konrad Heiden was one of the first to recognize the young Adolf Hitler's political ingenuity and his potential. In this eyewitness account of his rise to power, the author shows how the unsophisticated, but dangerously charismatic, Hitler turned a volatile situation in Europe to his own advantage. A contemporary interpretation of why and how, by 1934, Germany was in the thrall of Hitler's perverse and self-serving ideology.

Elizabeth Longford

Elizabeth Longford was the author of several highly-acclaimed works of biography. She died in 2002.

Abacus

Wellington

Elizabeth Longford
Abacus

Victoria

Elizabeth Longford

Queen Victoria, a woman of diminutive stature and superabundant temperament, gave her name to something more than an age. Using unrestricted access to material from the Royal Archives, including previously unpublished passages Queen Victoria's celebrated Journals, Elizabeth Longford's classic account remains the definitive biography of this extraordinary woman. She shows the queen tormented by an unhappy childhood; tantalised by an all-too-brief happy marriage; deeply shocked at the Prince Consort's death. She depicts the gradual emergence of the queen's renowned qualities, together with some surprising traits, presenting her in a fresh, affectionate and thoroughly human light. 'Dazzlingly readable, and very enjoyable' Stella Gibbons

The Harvard Lampoon

The Harvard Lampoon has been a premier humour magazine since 1876 when United States President Ulysses S. Grant was advised not to read the magazine, as he would be too much "in stitches" to run the government.