Related to: 'Fierce Enigmas'

PublicAffairs

The Levelling

Michael O'Sullivan
Authors:
Michael O'Sullivan
Hachette Books

The Black and the Blue

Matthew Horace, Ron Harris
Authors:
Matthew Horace, Ron Harris

Matthew Horace was an officer at the federal, state, and local level for 28 years working in every state in the country. Yet it was after seven years of service when Horace found himself face-down on the ground with a gun pointed at his head by a white fellow officer, that he fully understood the racism seething within America's police departments. Using gut-wrenching reportage, on-the-ground research, and personal accounts garnered by interviews with police and government officials around the country, Horace presents an insider's examination of police tactics, which he concludes is an "archaic system" built on "toxic brotherhood." Horace dissects some of the nation's most highly publicized police shootings and communities highlighted in the Black Lives Matter movement and beyond to explain how these systems and tactics have had detrimental outcomes to the people they serve. Horace provides fresh analysis on communities experiencing the high killing and imprisonment rates due to racist policing such as Ferguson, New Orleans, Baltimore, and Chicago from a law enforcement point of view and uncovers what has sown the seeds of violence.Timely and provocative, The Black and The Blue sheds light on what truly goes on behind the blue line.

Abacus

Dynasty

Tom Holland
Authors:
Tom Holland

'This is a wonderful, surging narrative - a brilliant and meticulous synthesis of the ancient sources . . . This is a story that should be read by anyone interested in history, politics or human nature - and it has never been better told' - Boris Johnson, Mail on SundayRome was first ruled by kings, then became a republic. But in the end, after conquering the world, the Republic collapsed. Rome was drowned in blood. So terrible were the civil wars that the Roman people finally came to welcome the rule of an autocrat who could give them peace. 'Augustus,' their new master called himself: 'The Divinely Favoured One'.The lurid glamour of the dynasty founded by Augustus has never faded. No other family can compare for sheer unsettling fascination with its gallery of leading characters. Tiberius, the great general who ended up a bitter recluse, notorious for his perversions; Caligula, the master of cruelty and humiliation who rode his chariot across the sea; Agrippina, the mother of Nero, manoeuvering to bring to power the son who would end up having her murdered; Nero himself, racing in the Olympics, marrying a eunuch, and building a pleasure palace over the fire-gutted centre of his capital.Now, in the sequel to Rubicon, Tom Holland gives a dazzling portrait of Rome's first imperial dynasty. Dynasty traces the full astonishing story of its rule of the world: both the brilliance of its allure, and the blood-steeped shadows cast by its crimes. Ranging from the great capital rebuilt in marble by Augustus to the dank and barbarian-haunted forests of Germany, it is populated by a spectacular cast: murderers and metrosexuals, adulterers and druids, scheming grandmothers and reluctant gladiators. Dynasty is the portrait of a family that transformed and stupefied Rome.

Andrew Yang

Andrew Yang is the founder of Venture for America, a major non-profit that places top college graduates in start-ups for two years in emerging U.S. cities to generate job growth and train the next generation of entrepreneurs. Yang has been the CEO, co-founder or executive at a number of technology and education companies. Yang was named a Presidential Ambassador of Global Entrepreneurship and a Champion of Change by the White House and one of Fast Company's "100 Most Creative People in Business." He was also named to the National Advisory Council for Innovation and Entrepreneurship of the Department of Commerce. A major documentary with an Oscar-winning director, Generation Startup,featuring Yang and Venture for America, was released in Fall 2016 and is available on Netflix and other streaming platforms. He is a graduate of Columbia Law, where he was an Editor of the Law Review, James Kent Scholar and winner of the Class of 1912 Prize, and Brown University where he graduated with degrees in Economics and Political Science.

Asne Seierstad

Åsne Seierstad was born in 1970 and studied Russian, Spanish and the History of Philosophy at Oslo University. An internationally bestselling author, she has also received numerous awards for her journalism. She has worked as a war correspondent across the world, including Russia, China, Iraq and Afghanistan. Her second book, The Bookseller of Kabul, has sold over two million copies and the paperback was in the Sunday Times top ten for over a year. Her other critically acclaimed works include A Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal and The Angel of Grozny. Following the atrocities in Oslo and Utoya in July 2011, she attended the trial of Anders Breivik and then began work on One of Us, which became a European bestseller. All of Åsne Seierstad's books are published by Virago.

Brian Wallace

Brian Wallace served as a Massachusetts state representative from 2003 to 2011. He grew up in South Boston and as a child met Steve Ross when Ross was assigned to his school as a youth worker. He credits Ross with inspiring him to stay in school and pursue his dream of becoming a politician.

Duncan White

Duncan White is a journalist and academic who combines his position as Lecturer in History and Literature at Harvard University with his role as a lead book reviewerand feature writer for the Telegraph. He is the author of Vladimir Nabokov: Late Modernism, the Cold War and the Literary Marketplace, editor of a collection ofessays on the life and work of Nabokov, and has established himself as a scholarly authority on mid-century American and Russian literature, with a particular focus on the Cold War. He moved to the United States in 2012 to join Wellesley College as a Newhouse Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer. At Wellesley he organised a lecture series on Cold War culture, featuring Pulitzer-winners Louis Menand and Anne Applebaum as guest speakers. Duncan is British and lives in Boston, Massachusetts.)

Glenn Frank

Glenn Frank is a Boston-based real-estate attorney and the author of Abe Gilman's Ending.

Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch's first novel, White Oleander, a #1 bestseller and Oprah's Book Club selection, has been translated into 24 languages and was made into a feature film. Her most recent novel, Paint It Black, hit bestseller lists across the country and has also been made into a film. She lives in Los Angeles.

Kim MacQuarrie

Kim MacQuarrie is a writer and filmmaker and fellow of the New York Explorers Club who has lived in Peru for over five years. She has made three films on the Peruvian Amazon in the region of Vilcabamba, including 'Spirits of the Rainforest', an Emmy-winning documentary.

Lesley Adkins

Roy and Lesley Adkins are husband-and-wife historians and authors of widely acclaimed books on naval and social history, including Jack Tar, Trafalgar, The War for All the Oceans and Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England, which have been translated into seventeen languages. They are Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London and the Royal Historical Society, as well as Members of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. They live in Devon. See www.adkinshistory.com

Mark Pendergrast

Mark Pendergrast was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and is the author of eleven books, including Uncommon Grounds and For God, Country and Coca-Cola. He lives in Vermont.

Peter Phelps

Peter Phelps is one of Australia's best-loved actors, regularly appearing in film, television and theatre productions. He is an AFI and Logie award winner and has directed episodes of All Saints and Home and Away. In 1994 he wrote the bestselling book Sex without Madonna: True confessions of a hired gun in Tinseltown (a wry look at his years in Hollywood). His second book, The Bulldog Track, is a very personal account of his grandfather's incredible survival in New Guinea during WWII, and his escape by the 'other Kokoda trail'.

Robert Carmichael

ROBERT CARMICHAEL worked for a decade as a foreign correspondent in Cambodia, leaving in 2017. His first stint was from 2001-3 when he was the managing editor of the Phnom Penh Post, Cambodia's oldest English-language newspaper. His role not only required him to run the news-gathering and editorial side of the newspaper, but also to write extensively about pressing national issues. Among those was the 2003 deal between the United Nations and the Cambodian government that resulted in the formation of the Khmer Rouge tribunal. He returned in early 2009 to cover Duch's trial, the first of four cases the tribunal was tackling. During that time, he worked as the country correspondent for the German wire service dpa, as well as for Radio Australia, Voice of America radio, BBC radio and Deutsche Welle, among others. He wrote numerous wire, radio and print articles about the tribunal and Duch's trial in particular, as well as news and features on other topics including the economy, social issues, politics, human rights and the environment. His writing appeared regularly through these outlets and others in Europe, Australasia and the Americas.Through his work Robert developed excellent relationships with some of the leading lights at the tribunal as well as experts in related fields including academics David Chandler, Stephen Heder and Craig Etcheson, as well as Youk Chhang who runs the genocide research organization DC-Cam. He travelled widely around Cambodia interviewing people about the Khmer Rouge period, the impact of the tribunal and the thorny issue of reconciliation, which as a South African, was of particular personal interest.In 2012, he wrote the 21,000-word text for the iPad app Quest for Land, whose 700 images shot over a decade by Magnum photographer John Vink cover the topic of land in Cambodia. In his New York Times review, veteran correspondent Seth Mydans praised the 'intelligent and thorough written text by the Phnom Penh-based journalist Robert Carmichael that enhances the images with context and analysis . . . [and] places the issue of land and land-grabbing firmly within the history and soul of a country that continues to feel the wounds of mass killings by the Khmer Rouge.' For two years, Robert was the president of the Overseas Press Club of Cambodia, and in that capacity established strong links with leading journalists in the region. Robert's website www.robertcarmichael.net contains many of his articles.

Roy Adkins

Roy and Lesley Adkins are husband-and-wife historians and authors of widely acclaimed books on naval and social history, including Jack Tar, Trafalgar, The War for All the Oceans and Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England, which have been translated into seventeen languages. They are Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London and the Royal Historical Society, as well as Members of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. They live in Devon. See www.adkinshistory.com

Running Press

Running Press, Running Press Kids, and Running Press Miniature Editions publish books that inspire, entertain and delight readers with innovative formats and irresistible packages for humor, pop culture, activity, cooking and self-help titles. The long-running miniature editions program features original bestsellers like Grow Your Own Mini Bonsai and top licenses like Harry Potter.

Steve Ross

Steve Ross, born Smulek Rozental, is the survivor of ten Nazi concentration camps--including Dachau, where he was tasked with transporting corpses to the crematorium. He was the Director of Education for the City of Boston, and he conceived of and founded the New England Holocaust Memorial, which was erected in 1995 and remains one of Boston's most visited landmarks.

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of dozens of books and the recipient of various awards, including the National Humanities Medal, Presented by the President of the United States in 2003.

Tom Holland

Tom Holland is an award-winning historian, author and broadcaster. He is the author of Rubicon: The Triumph and the Tragedy of the Roman Republic, which won the Hessell-Tiltman Prize for History and was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize; Persian Fire, his history of the Graeco-Persian wars, won the Anglo-Hellenic League's Runciman Award in 2006; Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom, a panoramic account of the two centuries on either side of the apocalyptic year 1000; In the Shadow of the Sword, which covers the collapse of Roman and Persian power in the Near East, and the emergence of Islam; and Dynasty, a portrait of Rome's first imperial dynasty.He has adapted Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides and Virgil for the BBC. His translation of Herodotus was published in 2013 by Penguin Classics and followed in 2016 by a history of Æthelstan published under the Penguin Monarchs series, and in 2019 Æthelflæd England's Forgotten Founder as a Ladybird Expert Book. In 2007, he was the winner of the Classical Association prize, awarded to 'the individual who has done most to promote the study of the language, literature and civilisation of Ancient Greece and Rome'.Holland is the presenter of BBC Radio 4's Making History. He has written and presented a number of TV documentaries for the BBC and Channel 4, on subjects ranging from religion to dinosaurs.He served two years as the Chair of the Society of Authors; as Chair of the PLR Advisory Committee and was on the committee of the Classical Association.@holland_tom

Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and lives in Selma, California.