Related to: 'Harry Pearson'

Robinson

Orderly Britain

Andrew Ward, Tim Newburn
Authors:
Andrew Ward, Tim Newburn

All societies, in their very different ways, are orderly. The very term 'society' implies the existence of a degree of organisation and predictability to human life. Orderliness, however, is a matter of degree. It is neither total, nor totally absent. In recent times, however, such concerns have largely given way to a greater preoccupation with disorderliness: with significant and disruptive social change; with rising crime and anti-social behaviour; and with a variety of other social problemsBut what has really been happening? How should we think about the nation's changing social order over the last seventy years? In Orderly Britain, Newburn and Ward focus on such commonplace, prosaic and mundane matters as dog-fouling, swearing, drinking, smoking, nudity, public toilets, and parking. These everyday matters, they argue, have much to tell us about social change and, more particularly, about the changing nature of British society.Written in an accessible style, full of quirky tales, this book provides an unusual approach to recent British social history. We read about social-order problems, boiling-point incidents, and the emergence of new expectations and control systems through our chosen topics. Through accessible, intriguing, prosaic tales - the hounding of beatniks in Cornwall in the 1960s, the banning of dogs from Burnley parks in the 1970s, the London parking crisis of the 1980s, the Naked Rambler in the 2000s - Orderly Britain reflects on the deeper sociological roots of our changing social order.In Orderly Britain the authors argue that post-war British society, in many respects, pays significantly greater attention to the issue of ordering and to laying down rules and regulations about conduct. Yes, elements of our lives are increasingly privatised but much of our behaviour is visible in ways and to extents never previously encountered - not least via electronic media. Consumerism, though it may have stimulated extraordinary acquisitiveness has also brought with it a huge array of administrative and technical regulations about matters as varied as food safety, the supply and sale of goods, and domestic animal welfare. In fact, there is considerable evidence that we have become more concerned about order, and more rule-bound by laws and regulations setting out the parameters of orderliness and how it is to be maintained. As a means of illustrating this argument, our first step along the road is toward the issue of dog-shit and what we do with it. Naturally, we must tread carefully.

Little, Brown

Connie

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson

Winner of the MCC Book of the Year AwardHis father was a first-class cricketer, his grandfather was a slave.Born in rural Trinidad in 1901, Learie Constantine was the most dynamic all-round cricketer of his age (1928-1939) when he played Test cricket for the West Indies and club cricket for Nelson. Few who saw Constantine in action would ever forget the experience. As well as the cricketing genius that led to Constantine being described as 'the most original cricketer of his time', Connie illuminates the world that he grew up in, a place where the memories of slavery were still fresh and where a peculiar, almost obsessive, devotion to 'Englishness' created a society that was often more British than Britain itself. Harry Pearson looks too at the society Constantine came to in England, which he would embrace as much as it embraced him: the narrow working-class world of the industrial North during a time of grave economic depression. Connie reveals how a flamboyant showman from the West Indies actually dovetailed rather well in a place where local music-hall stars such as George Formby, Frank Randle and Gracie Fields were fêted as heroes, and how Lancashire League cricket fitted into this world of popular entertainment.Connie tells an uplifting story about sport and prejudice, genius and human decency, and the unlikely cultural exchange between two very different places - the tropical island of Trinidad and the cloth-manufacturing towns of northern England - which shared the common language of cricket.

Constable

Red Planet

Luke Bainbridge
Authors:
Luke Bainbridge

Manchester United's rise to glory, under managerial giants Sir Matt Busby and later Sir Alex Ferguson, is one of the greatest sporting stories ever told. It's a tale that has attracted romantic dreamers, idealists and purists from all corners of the Red Planet to invest their own hopes and dreams in this most majestic of football clubs. But there is more to be told about Manchester United - the remarkable journey of how a humble football club from northern England became the most valuable sports brand in the world. The first sports team to be valued at over $3 billion, the club continues to go from strength to strength, and United's 2014 £750 million sponsorship deal with Adidas was record-breaking, surpassing not just Barcelona and Real Madrid, but major American sports.Red Planet tells of a fight for world domination and the creation of a Red Planet, against all the odds. United has faced bankruptcy more than once in its history and this is a club whose accountant was once refused money at the bank when he went to withdraw the players' wages, but now pays players like Wayne Rooney up to £300,000 per week. But most of all, it's a story about the battle for the soul of a football club, a battle some will fight to the death; whatever it takes to keep the red flag flying high. With a steady stream of new challenges, from the retirement of Sir Alex to the death of Sir Malcolm Glazer, a battle that some, conversely, think has already been lost.

ATOM

Straight Outta Crongton

Alex Wheatle
Authors:
Alex Wheatle

THE NEW NOVEL FROM THE WINNER OF THE GUARDIAN CHILDREN'S FICTION PRIZE 2016Round these ends, it's hard to hold on to your dreamsLife's a constant hustle for Mo. Her mum's boyfriend Lloyd is just another man who likes to beat down women; the South Crong streets are fraught with hazards and nasty G's; and when it comes to matters of the heart . . . she's still hung up on Sam.No wonder she's vexed so much of the time. Thank god her sistrens, Elaine and Naomi, are on her side: if one of them falls then they all fall.But when badness goes down and a life is left hanging in the balance, Mo has to face her hot urge for revenge . . . and she might end up losing more than she wins.

Robinson

No Milk Today

Andrew Ward
Authors:
Andrew Ward

Traditionally, in British society, the milkman has been a family friend, a sex symbol and a cheerful chappie. He has been the eyes and ears of the community, and his genetic legacy has supposedly passed into the lineage of housewives.This collection of folk tales about milkmen covers the history of the job and the milkman's everyday experience. The book is structured by the milkman's working day. It starts with the alarm-clock and ends with the milkman returning home in search of sustenance and tender loving care. The book is less about changes in the dairy industry and more about the work experiences of the people who have delivered milk. Many milkmen are featured: Chris Frankland delivered over eight million pints before he retired at seventy-four; Alistair Maclean drove two million miles across the north coast of Scotland in fifty years; and Tony Fowler, an award-winning Leicestershire milkman, helped to put over fifty people in prison.For more than thirty years the author has collected milkman stories through oral testimony, newspaper archives, anecdotes, diaries, books and more formal interviews.Praise for the author:Barnsley: A Study in Football, 1953-59 (with Ian Alister, Crowberry 1981)'A rare example of folk history . . . a work thankfully free of sick parrots, bulging nets and exclusive revelations.' (The Yorkshire Post)'riveting, dreamy, passionate, valuable and stuff of a past era which must not be forgotten . . . I read it in an all-night session.' (Frank Keating, Guardian)Cricket's Strangest Matches (Robson 1990)'Ward has an eye for the unusual and nicely dry style.' (Sunday Correspondent)Three Sides of the Mersey (with Rogan Taylor and John Williams, Robson, 1993)'. . . a labour of love. Built from copious interviews with players, club staff, and fans going back to the Twenties, it provides a permanent record of a 32-part series broadcast on Radio City last season. It's a compendious portrait of Liverpool's passion for football, and an endearing social history along the way.' (Independent)Armed with a Football (Crowberry 1994)'A riveting read for the maverick fan' (Independent)Kicking and Screaming (with Rogan Taylor, Robson, 1995)'Borrowing the straightforward oral history technique favoured by Studs Terkel and Lynn MacDonald, the authors assemble the memories of players, managers and fans into a mosaic from which an affectionate portrait of the English game emerges, with all its faults and virtues.' (Guardian)The Day of the Hillsborough Disaster (with Rogan Taylor and Tim Newburn, Liverpool University Press, 1995)'In many ways Taylor, Ward and Newburn have produced one of the best oral histories ever produced.' (Oral History)'It is the most dignified and respectful of memorials to the dead, dedicated to those who must still struggle with the consequences of the disaster, and it never succombs to the morbid or maudlin.' (Observer)'It is the most extraordinary account of what happened . . . Their book is gripping and extremely moving. After such tragedy, this book is cathartic.' (FourFourTwo)I'm on Me Mobile (with Anton Rippon, 2000)'One of the best came at Gloucester magistrates court in January 1994, when the defendant's phone rang. 'Can't talk now,' he said. 'I'm in the dock.' (Guardian)'One of the things that was in it was a woman saying "hang on a minute, I'll just get out my handbook and look under womb".' (Amazon)Football Nation (with John Williams, Bloomsbury, 2009)'Based on a dazzling array of largely oral evidence and written with a deeply attractive mixture of authority and humanity, it offers a bewitching, kaleidoscopic, alternative history of our national game since the war . . . Football is so often its own worst enemy, but Ward and Williams will remind many jaundiced readers why they fell in love with it.' (History Today)The Birth Father's Tale (BAAF, 2012)'Very personal account of Ward's search for his son, more than thirty years after the machinery of adoption removed him from Ward's life.' (Therapy Today)

Abacus

Landfalls

Naomi J. Williams
Authors:
Naomi J. Williams

An epic voyage, undertaken with the grandest of ambitions.Lapérouse leaves France in the Spring of 1785 with two ships under his command, knowing that he sails with the full backing of the French government. This is to be a voyage of scientific and geographical discovery - but every person on board has their own hopes, ambitions and dreams. As the ships move across vast distances in their journey of nearly four years, the different characters step forward and invite us into their world. From the remote Alaskan bay where a dreadful tragedy unfolds, to the wild journey Barthélemy de Lessups undertakes from the far east of Russia to St Petersburg, the reader is irresistibly drawn into a extraordinarily vivid world. Landfalls is a profoundly moving and intensely evocative novel about scientific exploration, human endeavour and individual tragedy,

Corsair

Barbarian Days

William Finnegan
Authors:
William Finnegan

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR BIOGRAPHY 2016WINNER OF THE 2016 WILLIAM HILL SPORTS BOOK OF THE YEAR PRIZESurfing only looks like a sport. To devotees, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a mental and physical study, a passionate way of life. William Finnegan first started surfing as a young boy in California and Hawaii. Barbarian Days is his immersive memoir of a life spent travelling the world chasing waves through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa and beyond. Finnegan describes the edgy yet enduring brotherhood forged among the swell of the surf; and recalling his own apprenticeship to the world's most famous and challenging waves, he considers the intense relationship formed between man, board and water.Barbarian Days is an old-school adventure story, a social history, an extraordinary exploration of one man's gradual mastering of an exacting and little-understood art. It is a memoir of dangerous obsession and enchantment.

ATOM

Crongton Knights

Alex Wheatle
Authors:
Alex Wheatle

Winner of the Guardian Children Fiction's Prize 2016Shortlisted for the YA Book Prize 2017Living on the South Crongton council estate has its worries - and life for McKay has been even tougher since his mum died. His dad has been working all hours to keep the bailiffs from their door. His brother is always out riding the streets at night, tempting trouble. And now, having strayed off his turf on a 'heroic' (if misguided) mission to help out a girl, McKay finds himself facing a friend's crazy ex-boyfriend, some power-tripping hood-rats and a notoriously violent gangster with a vendetta which hits too close to home.Poor McKay. He never asked for trouble . . . But during one madcap night of adventure and danger, he will find out who his true friends are and what it means to stick with your family. Crongton Knights is a very funny, very moving story that shows that although life is testing, the lessons learned the hard way are the ones you'll never forget.

Corsair

Katherine Carlyle

Rupert Thomson
Authors:
Rupert Thomson

In the late 80s, Katherine Carlyle is created using IVF. Stored as a frozen embryo for eight years, she is then implanted in her mother and given life. By the age of nineteen Katherine has lost her mother to cancer, and feels her father to be an increasingly distant figure. Instead of going to college, she decides to disappear, telling no one where she has gone. What begins as an attempt to punish her father for his absence gradually becomes a testing-ground of his love for her, a coming-to-terms with the death of her mother, and finally the mise-en-scene for a courageous leap from false empowerment to true empowerment.Written in the beautifully spare, lucid and cinematic prose that Thomson is known for, Katherine Carlyle uses the modern techniques of IVF and cryopreservation to throw new light on the myth of origins. It is a profound and moving novel about where we come from, what we make of ourselves, and how we are loved.

Little, Brown

Amazing Grace

Richard Tomlinson
Authors:
Richard Tomlinson

On a sunny afternoon in May 1868, nineteen-year-old Gilbert Grace stood in a Wiltshire field, wondering why he was playing cricket against the Great Western Railway Club. A batting genius, 'W. G.' should have been starring at Lord's in the grand opening match of the season. But MCC did not want to elect this humble son of a provincial doctor. W. G's career was faltering before it had barely begun.Grace finally forced his way into MCC and over the next three decades, millions came to watch him - not just at Lord's, but across the British Empire and beyond. Only W. G. could boast a fan base that stretched from an American Civil War general and the Prince of Wales's mistress to the children who fingered his coat-tails as he walked down the street, just to say 'I touched him'.The public never knew the darker story behind W. G.'s triumphal progress. Accused of avarice, W. G. was married to the daughter of a bankrupt. Disparaged as a simpleton, his subversive mind recast how to play sport - thrillingly hard, pushing the rules, beating his opponents his own way.In Amazing Grace, Richard Tomlinson unearths a life lived so far ahead of his times that W. G. is still misunderstood today. For the first time, Tomlinson delves into long-buried archives in England and Australia to reveal the real W. G: a self-made, self-destructive genius, at odds with the world and himself.

Little, Brown

Last Night on Earth

Kevin Maher
Authors:
Kevin Maher
Abacus

The Trundlers

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson
Abacus

The Fields

Kevin Maher
Authors:
Kevin Maher

We'd never seen anything like that around our place before. Not right in front of our eyes. You always heard about it, though. Through friends of friends. Or when The Mothers got together for coffee mornings. They'd sit around in a steamy kitchen circle like four mad witches, and dip ginger-snaps into Maxwell House until they went wobbly-warm, and take turns at saying, Jahear about so-and-so, Lord rest his soul, only thirty years old, poor creature?! They were brilliant at it. Scaring the shite out of each other, grinning inside.Jim Finnegan is thirteen years old and life in his world consists of dealing with the helter-skelter intensity of his rumbustious family, taking breakneck bike rides with his best friend, and coveting the local girls from afar - until one day when everything changes.The Fields is an unforgettable story of an extraordinary character: Jim's voice leaps off the page and straight into the reader's heart as he grapples with his unfairly interrupted adolescence.

Nation Books

Inverting The Pyramid

Jonathan Wilson
Authors:
Jonathan Wilson
Abacus

Dribble!

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson

Ten years in the making, Dribble! is an A-Z of credulity-twanging facts and stories about what Pele once memorably dubbed 'my bloody job'. It includes definitive explanations of everyday phrases such as 'the magic of the cup' and 'low centre of gravity'; a complete guide to becoming a terrace character and an in-depth account of how Roy Keane's pyjamas got him a smack on the nose . . . It also addresses hitherto ignored aspects of the beautiful game, including its longstanding relationship with Country and Western. Johnny Cash dubbed himself 'The Man in Black' in homage to his idol, referee Arthur Ellis and wrote what is arguably the greatest song ever written about the life of an assistant referee - 'I Walk the Line'.

Nation Books

Ajax, the Dutch, the War

Simon Kuper
Authors:
Simon Kuper

When most people think about the Netherlands, images of tulips and peaceful pot smoking residents spring to mind. Bring up soccer, and most will think of Johan Cruyuff, the Dutch player thought to rival Pele in preternatural skill, and Ajax, one of the most influential soccer clubs in the world whose academy system for young athletes has been replicated around the globe (and most notably by Barcelona and the 2010 world champions, Spain).But as international bestselling author Simon Kuper writes in Ajax, The Dutch, The War: Soccer in Europe During the Second World War , the story of soccer in Holland cannot be understood without investigating what really occurred in this country during WWII. For decades, the Dutch have enjoyed the reputation of having a good war." The myth is even resonant in Israel where Ajax is celebrated. The fact is, the Jews suffered shocking persecution at the hands of Dutch collabourators. Holland had the second largest Nazi movement in Europe outside Germany, and in no other country except Poland was so high a percentage of Jews deported.Kuper challenges Holland's historical amnesia and uses soccer,particularly the experience of Ajax, a club long supported by Amsterdam's Jews,as a window on wartime Holland and Europe. Through interviews with Resistance fighters, survivors, wartime soccer players and more, Kuper uncovers this history that has been ignored, and also finds out why the Holocaust had a profound effect on soccer in the country.Ajax produced Cruyuff but was also built by members of the Dutch resistance and Holocaust survivors. It became a surrogate family for many who survived the war and its method for producing unparalleled talent became the envy of clubs around the world. In this passionate, haunting and moving work of forensic reporting, Kuper tells the breathtaking story of how Dutch Jews survived the unspeakable and came to play a strong role in the rise of the most exciting and revolutionary style of soccer , Total Football" , the world had ever seen.

Abacus

Slipless In Settle

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson

Slipless in Settle is a sentimental journey around club cricket in the north of England, a world far removed from the clichéd lengthening-shadows-on-the-village-green image of the summer game. This is hardcore cricket played in former pit villages and mill towns. Winner of the 2011 MCC Cricket Book of the Year, it is about the little clubs that have, down the years, produced some of the greatest players Britain has ever seen, and at one time spent a fortune on importing the biggest names in the international game to boost their battle for local supremacy.Slipless in Settle is a warm, affectionate and outrageously funny sporting odyssey in which Andrew Flintoff and Learie Constantine rub shoulders with Asbo-tag-wearing all-rounders, there's hot-pot pie and mushy peas at the tea bar, two types of mild in the clubhouse, and a batsman is banned for a month for wearing a fireman's helmet when going out to face Joel Garner . . .

Constable

Cupcakes and Kalashnikovs

Eleanor Mills
Authors:
Eleanor Mills

Many female journalists came to the fore during the first and second world wars, and their perspective was very different to that of their male peers, who were reporting from the field. Specifically, they often wrote about war from the perspective of those left at home, struggling to keep the household afloat. And with 'How it feels to be forcibly fed' (1914) by Djuna Barnes, one of the world's very first experiential, or 'gonzo' journalists, came a new age of reporting.Since then, women have continued to break new ground in newspapers and magazines, redefining the world as we see it. Many of the pieces here feel almost unsettlingly relevant today -- the conclusions Emma 'Red' Goldman drew in her 1916 'The social aspects of birth control', Maddy Vegtel's 1930s article about becoming pregnant at 40, Eleanor Roosevelt's call for greater tolerance after America's race riots in 1943. Many have pushed other limits: Naomi Wolf's Beauty Myth brought feminism to a new generation; Helen Fielding's Bridget Jones caused a media revolution; Ruth Picardie's unflinchingly honest column about living with cancer in 1997 brought a wave of British candour and a host of imitators; and when two iconic women come face to face, we have at one end Dorothy Parker on Isadora Duncan (1928) and at the other Julie Burchill on Margaret Thatcher (2004). This collection of superlative writing, selected by the Sunday Times's most senior female editor, brings together the most influential, incisive, controversial, affecting and entertaining pieces of journalism by the best women in the business. Covering: War; Crime; Politics & Society; Sex & Romance; Body Image & Health; Family, Friendship & Birth; Emancipation & Having it All; Hearth & Home; Icons & Interviews. Including: Lynn Barber, Djuna Barnes, Julie Burchill, Angela Carter, Marie Colvin, Jilly Cooper, Joan Didion, Margaret Drabble, Helen Fielding, Zelda Fitzgerald, Kathryn Flett, Martha Gellhorn, Nicci Gerrard, Emma Goldman, Germaine Greer, Nicola Horlick, Erica Jong, Jamaica Kincaid, India Knight, Christina Lamb, Daphne du Maurier, Nancy Mitford, Suzanne Moore, Camille Paglia, Sylvia Pankhurst, Dorothy Parker, Allison Pearson, Ruth Picardie, Erin Pizzey, Eleanor Roosevelt, Zadie Smith, Susan Sontag, Gloria Steinem, Martha Stewart, Mary Stott, Jill Tweedie, Rebecca West, Zoe Williams, Jeanette Winterson, Naomi Wolf.

Abacus

Racing Pigs And Giant Marrows

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson

Following his acclaimed book about football in the north-east,THE FAR CORNER, Harry Pearson vowed that his next project would not involve hanging around outdoors on days so cold that itinerant dogs had to be detached from lamp-posts by firemen. It would be about the summer: specifically, about a summer of shows and fairs in the north of England.Encompassing such diverse talents as fell-running, tupperware-boxing and rabbit fancying (literally), and containing many more jokes about goats than is legal in the Isle of Man, Racing Pigs and Giant Marrows is without doubt the only book in existence to explain the design faults of earwigs and expose English farmers' fondness for transvestism. Warm, wise and very funny, it confirms increasing suspicions that Harry Pearson is really quite good.

Abacus

The Far Corner

Harry Pearson
Authors:
Harry Pearson

A book in which Wilf Mannion rubs shoulders with The Sunderland Skinhead: recollections of Len Shakleton blight the lives of village shoppers: and the appointment of Kevin Keegan as manager of Newcastle is celebrated by a man in a leather stetson, crooning 'For The Good Times' to the accompaniment of a midi organ, THE FAR CORNER is a tale of heroism and human frailty, passion and the perils of eating an egg mayonnaise stottie without staining your trousers.