Will Hutton - How Good We Can Be - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781408705322
    • Publication date:12 Feb 2015

How Good We Can Be

Ending the Mercenary Society and Building a Great Country

By Will Hutton

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

A compelling and sharply insightful book that examines the state of Britain today and looks forward to the Britain of tomorrow, from the bestselling author of The State We're In.

Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. For a generation we have been told the route to universal well-being is to abandon the expense of justice and equity and so allow the judgments of the market to go unobstructed. What has been created is not an innovative, productive economy but instead a capitalism that extracts value rather than creates it, massive inequality, shrinking opportunity and a society organised to benefit the top 1%. The capacity to create new jobs and start-ups should not disguise that in the main the new world is one of throw away people working in throw away companies. The British are at a loss.

The warnings of The State We're In have been amply justified. Will Hutton observes that the trends that so disturbed him twenty years ago have become more marked. Rather than take refuge in nativism and virulent euro-scepticism, Britain must recognize that its problems are largely made at home - and act to change them. With technological possibilities multiplying, a wholesale makeover of the state, business and the financial system is needed to seize the opportunities by being both fairer and more innovative. The aim must be to create an economy, society and democracy in which the mass of citizens flourish. In this compelling and vital new book Hutton spells out how.

Biographical Notes

Will Hutton is Principal of Hertford College, co-founder of the Big Innovation Centre and a columnist for the Observer, where he was Editor, then Editor-in-Chief for four years. He began his career in journalism as economics editor for the BBC's Newsnight and for the Guardian.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349140087
  • Publication date: 03 Sep 2015
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Abacus
A magnificent survey of a post-Thatcherite wasteland of financial gluttony, where shareholder value is worshipped above all else, public goods are squandered and inequality widens. Crucially, Hutton offers some richly innovative alternatives. His analysis burns with reasonable anger and brilliant hope — Ian McEwan
Will Hutton finds his clearest voice yet. The cities of London and Westminster should read and find a long lost humility. Everyone else may find hope — Shami Chakrabarti, Director of Liberty
Sweeps you off your feet with its hard-headed optimism, a vision of capitalism working for the many — Avner Offer, Chichele Professor Emeritus of Economic History at Oxford, and Fellow of All Souls College
Policymakers are searching for a big idea to wake the economy from its slumber, to shake it from its stagnation. We are in luck. Will Hutton has found one — Andy Haldane, Chief Economist of the Bank of England
Hutton is as persuasive, and as furious, as ever. He is angry, and it is hard not to be angry along with him — Times Higher Education Supplement
When the British left is so bereft of vision and so tentative about the modest ideas it does have, Hutton comes as a breath of fresh air . . . Hutton predicts a glorious future — Guardian
[Hutton] writes with passion, controlled anger, and a good deal of evidence about the ills that beset British society in the second decade of this century — Lancet
What New Labour lacked wasn't heart, it was ideas - and if the party is to win power again, it's going to need to listen to people like Will Hutton — Independent on Sunday
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