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Pope Francis

By Marie Duhamel
Authors:
Marie Duhamel
This one-of-a-kind book is a comprehensive biography of the pope completely illustrated with more than 250 photographs and 50 removable documents. Beginning with his birth as Jorge Mario Bergoglio in Argentina in 1936, the book follows his life from his childhood and overcoming a life-threatening pneumonia as a young adult, to his studies in a Jesuit seminary and rise from priest to bishop to cardinal to pope. The book explores his concern for the poor and chronicles his recently travel around the world. The enclosed documents include facsimiles of Bergoglio's birth certificate, photographs from his childhood, pages from a school notebook, handwritten notes as Pope Francis, and even a support card for his beloved San Lorenzo soccer club.With a foreword by Federico Lombardi, director of the Press Office of the Holy See in Rome, and the endorsement of the Vatican, Pope Francis is an glorious celebration of this popular pontiff and his remarkable papacy.
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Pigs Can't Swim

By Helen Peppe
Authors:
Helen Peppe
An outrageous, hilarious, and touching memoir by the youngest of nine children in a hardscrabble, beyond-eccentric Maine family. With everything happening on Helen Peppe's backwoods Maine farm, life was wild- and not just for the animals. Sibling rivalry, rock-bottom poverty, feral male chauvinism, sex in the hayloft: everything seemed- and was- out of control. In telling her wayward family tale, Peppe manages deadpan humour, an unerring eye for the absurd, and poignant compassion for her utterly overwhelmed parents. While her feisty resilience and candour will inevitably remind readers of Jeannette Walls or Mary Karr, Peppe's wry insight and moments of tenderness with family and animals are entirely her own. As Richard Hoffman, the author of Half the House: A Memoir puts it: " Pigs Can't Swim is an unruly, joyous troublemaker of a book."
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Poster Girl

By Beccy Cole
Authors:
Beccy Cole
Beccy Cole has country music in her blood. Daughter of a country music star, Carole Sturtzel, she is one of the most popular country singer-songwriters in Australia today. This is the story of her life - in her own words.At fourteen, Beccy was performing in her mother's group, Wild Oats. By her late teens, Beccy had teamed up with the Dead Ringer Band - Kasey Chambers' family band - and had attracted the attention of the country music world by winning the Star Maker quest: the same award that started the careers of Keith Urban, Lee Kernaghan, James Blundell and Gina Jeffreys. It was just the first of many awards and accolades for this multitalented woman with a big heart.With refreshing candour, Beccy shares her story: leaving everything she knew to pursue her dream, making a name for herself with her own band; her marriage and motherhood; her subsequent divorce, becoming a single mother and maintaining the nurturing love of family. Performing for the Australian troops in Afghanistan. Coming out, and what it has meant for her and her fans. Taking control of her own life - and finding love.Heartfelt and honest, Poster Girl is the inspirational memoir of a strong woman who epitomises the authentic spirit of country music, and of Australia.
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The Phantom of Fifth Avenue

By Meryl Gordon
Authors:
Meryl Gordon
Born in 1906, Huguette Clark grew up in her family's 121-room Beaux Arts mansion in New York and was one of the leading celebrities of her day. Her father William Andrews Clark, was a copper magnate, the second richest man in American, and not above bribing his way into the Senate. Huguette attended the coronation of King George V. And at twenty-two with a personal fortune of $50 million to her name, she married a Princeton man and childhood friend William MacDonald Gower. Two-years later the couple divorced. After a series of failed romances, Huguette began to withdraw from society--first living with her mother in a kind of Grey Gardens isolation then as a modern-day Miss Havisham, spending her days in a vast apartment overlooking Central Park, eating crackers and watching The Flintstones with only servants for company.All her money and all her real estate could not protect her in her later life from being manipulated by shady hangers-on and hospitals that were only too happy to admit (and bill) a healthy woman. But what happened to Huguette that turned a vivacious, young socialite into a recluse? And what was her life like inside that gilded, copper cage?
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The Puppy Express

By David Rosenfelt
Authors:
David Rosenfelt
All aboard!When David Rosenfelt and his family embarked on a roadtrip across the USA to their new home in Maine, he thought he had prepared for every eventuality. They had mapped out the route, brought three just-in-case SatNavs and had enough snacks to feed an army. There was just one tiny complication - they were travelling with twenty-five rescue dogs: a sure-fire recipe for chaos. But having devoted their lives to rehoming thousands of unwanted and unloved dogs, there was no way they could leave them behind.With nine volunteers, three motorhomes and several contingency plans, David and his very large, very hairy family set off on a journey that will test his patience and his sense of humour to the limits. This is a hilarious and uplifting tale of a canine cross-country adventure like no other; if David and his dogs make it to Maine in one piece, it will be a miracle!
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Passion for Life

By Joan Collins
Authors:
Joan Collins
Having lived many lives when most of us only live one, the stories of Joan Collins' adventures on film sets around the world, the friendships she made, the triumphs and the near disasters could fill many books. Encounters with Princess Diana, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the romantic story of her courtship and marriage to Percy Gibson are among the new stories Joan shares, in this latest instalment of her witty, wise and revelatory memoirs.Following on from where Second Act left off, the screen icon reveals details of her life with her fifth (and final) husband Percy, her travels around the world, fun with family and friends, and shares more revealing anecdotes about the fascinating people she has met during her life. A Passion for Life is - quite literally - an expression of the joie de vivre which Joan exudes. Filled with fabulous never-before-seen images of her life, from childhood to recent holiday snaps with Percy and her children, this is the ultimate illustrated guide to the life of a British icon.
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Permanent Present Tense

By Suzanne Corkin
Authors:
Suzanne Corkin
In 1953, 27-year-old Henry Gustave Molaison underwent an experimental psychosurgical" procedure,a targeted lobotomy,in an effort to alleviate his debilitating epilepsy. The outcome was unexpected,when Henry awoke, he could no longer form new memories, and for the rest of his life would be trapped in the moment. But Henry's tragedy would prove a gift to humanity. As renowned neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin explains in Permanent Present Tense , she and her colleagues brought to light the sharp contrast between Henry's crippling memory impairment and his preserved intellect. This new insight that the capacity for remembering is housed in a specific brain area revolutionized the science of memory. The case of Henry,known only by his initials H. M. until his death in 2008,stands as one of the most consequential and widely referenced in the spiraling field of neuroscience. Corkin and her collabourators worked closely with Henry for nearly fifty years, and in Permanent Present Tense she tells the incredible story of the life and legacy of this intelligent, quiet, and remarkably good-humoured man. Henry never remembered Corkin from one meeting to the next and had only a dim conception of the importance of the work they were doing together, yet he was consistently happy to see her and always willing to participate in her research. His case afforded untold advances in the study of memory, including the discovery that even profound amnesia spares some kinds of learning, and that different memory processes are localized to separate circuits in the human brain. Henry taught us that learning can occur without conscious awareness, that short-term and long-term memory are distinct capacities, and that the effects of aging-related disease are detectable in an already damaged brain.Undergirded by rich details about the functions of the human brain, Permanent Present Tense pulls back the curtain on the man whose misfortune propelled a half-century of exciting research. With great clarity, sensitivity, and grace, Corkin brings readers to the cutting edge of neuroscience in this deeply felt elegy for her patient and friend.
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Pollyanne

By Sarah Oliver
Authors:
Sarah Oliver
John McLaren has dedicated his life to rescuing mistreated donkeys. When he finds Pollyanne at a livestock auction - unloved and horribly frail - he knows immediately that if he doesn't take her home to the sanctuary he has made his life's work, she stands little chance of surviving. John soon discovers that despite her terrible start in life, Pollyanne has the X factor: she is destined for more than the local nativity play. The bright lights of the West End beckon and before long, Pollyanne is appearing onstage with opera's biggest stars.She may have hit the animal A-list, but Pollyanne's no diva. When the curtain comes down, there's nowhere she'd rather be than at home with John and her four-legged friends. Sarah Oliver's Pollyanne is a heart-warming true story of unconditional love - and a Little Donkey with star quality.
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Pudsey

By Pudsey
Authors:
Pudsey
Earlier this year, a dog danced his way into the history books as the first canine winner of Britain's Got Talent. En route to the title, Pudsey and his owner Ashleigh Butler won over Walliams, delighted Dixon, stole the heart of Holden, and utterly captivated Cowell. They charmed the nation, too - with millions of viewers tuning in to see them take the crown.But what do we really know of Pudsey's journey to stardom? How did he get from being a depressed dog to the mutt of the moment? In this, the most unusual celebrity book of the year, he's finally ready to tell his tale.As a young pup, Pudsey always knew he was somehow different to his dog-standard peers. While his brothers and sisters contented themselves with chasing their tails, he sat apart, yearning for something more. With the help of the menagerie of pets that fill the Butler household and despite some dastardly opposition threatening to stop him at every turn, Pudsey managed to achieve his dream. This Autobidography tells the story of his incredibly journey, straight from the dog's mouth.
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Paw Tracks

By Denis O'Connor
Authors:
Denis O'Connor
Scarred by the rejection and humiliation which he suffers at the hands of his unloving father, the young Denis O'Connor finds solace in the woods and riverbanks of his native Northumberland.Nevertheless, his newly found happiness communing with nature and the local animals - a neighbour's violent dog, an untamed horse, a wounded goose and a white cat called Brumas - is severely tested when he finds his pet dog has been put down. This tragic incident almost results in Denis's own death but for the timely intervention of a stranger's golden retriever which saves his life. As he grows older, Denis begins to unravel the dark secret of his own origins and uncovers the mystery as why he was so tormented.Paw Tracks is a searingly honest account of how the power of nature can lift the human spirit and overcome the most unloving of childhoods.
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The Partisan

By John A. Jenkins
Authors:
John A. Jenkins
As a young lawyer practicing in Arizona, far from the political centre of the country, William Hubbs Rehnquist's iconoclasm made him a darling of Goldwater Republicans. He was brash and articulate. Although he was unquestionably ambitious and extraordinarily self-confident, his journey to Washington required a mixture of good-old-boy connections and rank good fortune. An outsider and often lone dissenter on his arrival, Rehnquist outlasted the liberal vestiges of the Warren Court and the collegiate conservatism of the Burger Court, until in 1986 he became the most overtly political conservative to sit as chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Over that time Rehnquist's thinking pointedly did not--indeed, could not--evolve. Dogma trumped leadership. So, despite his intellectual gifts, Rehnquist left no body of law or opinions that define his tenure as chief justice or even seem likely to endure. Instead, Rehnquist bestowed a different legacy: he made it respectable to be an expedient conservative on the Court. The Supreme Court now is as deeply divided politically as the executive and legislative branches of our government, and for this Rehnquist must receive the credit or the blame. His successor as chief justice, John Roberts, is his natural heir. Under Roberts, who clerked for Rehnquist, the Court remains unrecognizable as an agent of social balance. Gone are the majorities that expanded the Bill of Rights. The Rehnquist Court, which lasted almost twenty years, was moulded in his image. In thirty-three years on the Supreme Court, from 1972 until his death in 2005 at age 80, Rehnquist was at the centre of the Court's dramatic political transformation. He was a partisan, waging a quiet, constant battle to imbue the Court with a deep conservatism favouring government power over individual rights. The story of how and why Rehnquist rose to power is as compelling as it is improbable. Rehnquist left behind no memoir, and there has never been a substantial biography of him: Rehnquist was an uncooperative subject, and during his lifetime he made an effort to ensure that journalists would have scant material to work with. John A. Jenkins has produced the first full biography of Rehnquist, exploring the roots of his political and judicial convictions and showing how a brilliantly instinctive jurist, who began his career on the Court believing he would only ever be an isolated voice of right-wing objection, created the ethos of the modern Supreme Court.

Pale Girl Speaks

By Hillary Fogelson
Authors:
Hillary Fogelson
Hillary Fogelson led a charmed life: as the young wife of a successful Hollywood executive, her only major concerns were her acting auditions, interior decorating, and unexpected visits from her high-maintenance parents. Then, one day, her doctor told her she had malignant melanoma,a cancer that leads to more deaths for women between the age of 25 and 30 than any other,and her life was forever changed. Pale Girl Speaks is the darkly funny story of Fogelson's neuroses and struggles after her diagnosis with melanoma. In her witty, wisecracking narrative, Fogelson recounts how her battle with cancer brings up other issues in her life that she's been ignoring, especially her anxieties about her relationship with her husband, her friends, and her parents. The apprehension she feels soon manifests itself in more concrete ways,panic attacks, heavy reliance on alcohol, and a compulsive need to constantly check in with her doctor,but when her father discovers that he has melanoma as well, Fogelson has to learn to lead by example and let go of her fear. A story that will appeal to anyone who has faced adversity and lived to tell jokes about it, Pale Girl Speaks is about one woman who experienced the worst possible fallout of being fair-skinned,and survived with her sense of humour intact.
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Point To Point Navigation

By Gore Vidal
Authors:
Gore Vidal
POINT TO POINT NAVIGATION refers to a form of navigation Gore Vidal resorted to as a first mate in the navy during World War II. As he says, 'As I was writing this account of my life and times since PALIMPSEST, I felt as if I were again dealing with those capes and rocks in the Bering Sea that we had to navigate so often with a compass made inoperable by weather.' It is a beautifully apt analogy for the hazards eluded (mostly) during his eventful life. From his desks in Ravello and the Hollywood Hills, Gore Vidal travels in memory through the arenas of literature, television, film, theatre, politics, and international society, recounting achievements and defeats, friends and enemies made (and on a number of occasions lost). Among the gathering of notables to be found in these pages, Tennessee Williams, Eleanor Roosevelt, Orson Welles, Greta Garbo, and Francis Ford Coppola. Some of the book's most moving pages are devoted to the illness and death of his partner of five decades, Howard Austen, and indeed the book is, among other things, a meditation on mortality, written in the spirit of Montaigne.
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Patrick Henry

By Thomas S. Kidd
Authors:
Thomas S. Kidd
Most Americans know Patrick Henry as a fiery speaker whose pronouncement Give me liberty or give me death!" rallied American defiance to the British Crown. But Henry's skills as an orator,sharpened in the small towns and courtrooms of colonial Virginia,are only one part of his vast, but largely forgotten, legacy. As historian Thomas S. Kidd shows, Henry cherished a vision of America as a virtuous republic with a clearly circumscribed central government. These ideals brought him into bitter conflict with other Founders and were crystallized in his vociferous opposition to the U.S. Constitution. In Patrick Henry , Kidd pulls back the curtain on one of our most radical, passionate Founders, showing that until we understand Henry himself, we will neglect many of the Revolution's animating values.
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Paw Tracks at Owl Cottage

By Denis O'Connor, Richard Morris
Authors:
Denis O'Connor
Illustrated by:
Richard Morris
When Denis O'Connor and his wife Catherine return to Owl Cottage, only to find it in a dilapidated state, they decide to restore his former home. But the memory of Denis's beloved cat, Toby Jug, still lingers on. On impulse, he buys four Maine Coon kittens and names them Pablo, Carlos, Luis and Max.Set against the wilds of the Northumbrian coast, Denis tenderly and humorously charts the ups and downs of life with his mischievous new cats. Forays into this beautiful countryside - in order to train his cats to bond more closely with him - are never without incident. However, when Pablo disappears, Denis is once again reminded of Toby Jug and the strength of bond between man and cat...Praise for Paw Tracks in the Moonlight:'A charming book that will appeal to all ages' The Pulse.'This genuinely endearing cat's life story is going to warm the cockles of hearts all over the world' Lancashire Evening Post.
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A Promise To Nadia

By Zana Muhsen, Andrew Crofts
Authors:
Zana Muhsen, Andrew Crofts
Ten years previously Zana Muhsen escaped from the life of slavery in the Yemen into which her father had sold her as a child bride, leaving behind her baby son, her sister Nadia, and Nadia's two small children. As she described so powerfully in her internationally bestselling book SOLD, Zana made a solemn vow to Nadia that she would do everything she possibly could to obtain their freedom as well.A PROMISE TO NADIA tells the extraordinary story of those ten years; of the family's lone campaign against the Yemeni authorities; of the refusal of their own government in London to help; and of the despair that forced them into a desperate deal with an unofficial military-style organisation specialising in the recovery of abducted children.
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Patti Smith's Horses

By Mark Paytress
Authors:
Mark Paytress
Before The Sex Pistols, before The Clash, before The Ramones, there was Patti Smith. The poet laureate of punk, she burst onto a vacuous music scene in the mid-1970s with a raw and revolutionary sound. With the release of her debut album, Horses, rock music would simply never be the same.Using all-new interviews with those close to Smith, Mark Paytress puts the story of Horses into its full context: from the singer's early days to her rapid rise on New York's performance art scene and the key role she played in the emerging art-punk movement at CBGBs. PATTI SMITH'S HORSES tells the unforgettable story of a landmark album, the new rock aesthetic that it brought about, and how Patti Smith became the most influential female rock 'n' roller of all time.
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Paw Tracks in the Moonlight

By Denis O'Connor
Authors:
Denis O'Connor
When Denis O'Connor rescues a three-week-old kitten from certain death during a snowstorm, little does he know how this tiny creature will change his life forever. Against all odds the kitten - who he names Toby Jug - survives and forms an unusually strong bond with his rescuer.Set against the rural splendour of Northumberland, Paw Tracks in the Moonlight charmingly chronicles the adventures of one man and his Maine Coone cat. From an invasion of bees at Owl Cottage to the case of the disappearing tomatoes, life with Toby Jug - who believes himself to be human - is never dull. Nevertheless, it is only when Denis and Toby Jug embark on a summer camping trip on horseback in the Cheviot Hills that a new world opens up for them both.
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Peter Jennings

By Kate Darnton, Kayce Freed Jennings, Lynn Sherr
Authors:
Kate Darnton, Kayce Freed Jennings, Lynn Sherr
For many Americans, Peter Jennings was the voice and face that gave shape and meaning to every day's news. In this oral biography, readers witness Jennings' extraordinary rise to the top of his profession, but they get to know him as a person, too. It brings together memories contributed by Peter's friends, family, competitors, colleagues, and interview subjects. They reveal facets of a man many of us felt we knew well,but only because he greeted us every weekday evening from our television sets. Peter Jennings was a celebrity, of course, but in these pages he is remembered as a loyal friend and a devoted family man. Throughout his life, Peter Jennings was driven by a passion to seek the truth and convey that truth accurately, simply, cleanly, and elegantly to his American audience. He was our voice.

Paper Houses

By Michele Roberts
Authors:
Michele Roberts
Rebellion, revolution, experimental living, feminist communes, street theatre, radical magazines, love affairs - gay and straight - sex, drugs and rock and roll.Michèle Roberts, one of Britain's most talented and highly acclaimed novelists, now considers her own life, in this vibrant, powerful portrait of a time and place: alternative London of the 1970s and beyond. A fledgling writer taking a leap into radical politics, Roberts finds alternative homes, new families and lifelong friendships in the streets and houses of Holloway, Peckham, Regent's Park and Notting Hill Gate. From Spare Rib to publishing her first book, Paper Houses is Roberts' story of finding a space in which to live, love and write - and learning to share it.'Beguiling, enthusiastic, charming and vivid, this is an autobiography to be savoured' Amanda Craig, DAILY TELEGRAPH
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