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Phileas Dogg's Guide to Dog Friendly Holidays in Britain

By Jane Common
Authors:
Jane Common
A canine guide to British holidays, seeking out the best dog-friendly days out, beaches, hotels, pubs, campsites, cottages and holidays. An amusing and informative guide, illustrated with photos of different dogs, from pedigrees to mutts, at various locations around Britain. The book builds on the success of the website www.phileasdogg.com, which has been running for 18 months and has a mailing list and social media following in the thousands. The site's main canine correspondent is Attlee, aka Phileas Dogg, a three year old Battersea mongrel, owned by freelance journalist Jane Common. As well as Attlee, the site is written by a team of Rover Reporters from as far afield as the Shetland Isles and Cornwall. In the short time it's been running, the site has been picked up by The Evening Standard and The Guardian - "even if you don't have a dog we urge you to read this"; Waitrose Weekend, Prima, Real People and Dogs Today magazines as well as generating local paper stories around the country, in places where Phileas has visited. Jane has been invited on to BBC Radio as an expert in dog travel and worked with Visit England, the Kennel Club and Battersea Dogs and Cats Home to promote dog-friendly holidays and days out.
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A Place in Italy

By Simon Mawer
Authors:
Simon Mawer
'You can't go and live there,' a despairing friend remarked, 'it's not even in Rome.' And it certainly wasn't, but still the author and his wife went to Avea, tucked away amongst the woods and gorges of the Lazio countryside.There they found no Colosseum, or Pantheon; there were no Ferraris racing around the Palazzi Navona, Venezia or Farnese. Instead they discovered the true agony and beauty of Italy: the instinctive warmth of the Avea villagers, the camorra, Little Tony - Italy's answer to Elvis - the elegant and sophisticated Colasanti family and a landlord like no other, Pippo, the self-styled Duca di Avea. This is not a story of the high culture of Italy's big cities, instead of how two foreigners learned to eat the Italian way, drive the Italian way, survive the Italian way - even to have a child the Italian way - and how in doing it they came to love this hidden corner of the most visited and least understood country in Europe.

The People's Guide to Mexico

By Carl Franz, Lorena Havens, Steve Rogers, Felisa Churpa Rosa Rogers
Authors:
Carl Franz, Lorena Havens, Steve Rogers, Felisa Churpa Rosa Rogers
Over the past 35 years, hundreds of thousands of readers have agreed: This is the classic guide to "living, traveling, and taking things as they come" in Mexico. Now in its updated 14th edition, The People's Guide to Mexico still offers the ideal combination of basic travel information, entertaining stories, and friendly guidance about everything from driving in Mexico City to hanging a hammock to bartering at the local mercado . Features include:Advice on planning your trip, where to go, and how to get around once you're therePractical tips to help you stay healthy and safe, deal with red tape, change money, send email, letters and packages, use the telephone, do laundry, order food, speak like a local, and moreWell-informed insight into Mexican culture, and hints for enjoying traditional fiestas and celebrationsThe most complete information available on Mexican Internet resources, book and map reviews, and other info sources for travellers

The Partisan

By John A. Jenkins
Authors:
John A. Jenkins
As a young lawyer practicing in Arizona, far from the political centre of the country, William Hubbs Rehnquist's iconoclasm made him a darling of Goldwater Republicans. He was brash and articulate. Although he was unquestionably ambitious and extraordinarily self-confident, his journey to Washington required a mixture of good-old-boy connections and rank good fortune. An outsider and often lone dissenter on his arrival, Rehnquist outlasted the liberal vestiges of the Warren Court and the collegiate conservatism of the Burger Court, until in 1986 he became the most overtly political conservative to sit as chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Over that time Rehnquist's thinking pointedly did not--indeed, could not--evolve. Dogma trumped leadership. So, despite his intellectual gifts, Rehnquist left no body of law or opinions that define his tenure as chief justice or even seem likely to endure. Instead, Rehnquist bestowed a different legacy: he made it respectable to be an expedient conservative on the Court. The Supreme Court now is as deeply divided politically as the executive and legislative branches of our government, and for this Rehnquist must receive the credit or the blame. His successor as chief justice, John Roberts, is his natural heir. Under Roberts, who clerked for Rehnquist, the Court remains unrecognizable as an agent of social balance. Gone are the majorities that expanded the Bill of Rights. The Rehnquist Court, which lasted almost twenty years, was moulded in his image. In thirty-three years on the Supreme Court, from 1972 until his death in 2005 at age 80, Rehnquist was at the centre of the Court's dramatic political transformation. He was a partisan, waging a quiet, constant battle to imbue the Court with a deep conservatism favouring government power over individual rights. The story of how and why Rehnquist rose to power is as compelling as it is improbable. Rehnquist left behind no memoir, and there has never been a substantial biography of him: Rehnquist was an uncooperative subject, and during his lifetime he made an effort to ensure that journalists would have scant material to work with. John A. Jenkins has produced the first full biography of Rehnquist, exploring the roots of his political and judicial convictions and showing how a brilliantly instinctive jurist, who began his career on the Court believing he would only ever be an isolated voice of right-wing objection, created the ethos of the modern Supreme Court.

Pale Girl Speaks

By Hillary Fogelson
Authors:
Hillary Fogelson
Hillary Fogelson led a charmed life: as the young wife of a successful Hollywood executive, her only major concerns were her acting auditions, interior decorating, and unexpected visits from her high-maintenance parents. Then, one day, her doctor told her she had malignant melanoma,a cancer that leads to more deaths for women between the age of 25 and 30 than any other,and her life was forever changed. Pale Girl Speaks is the darkly funny story of Fogelson's neuroses and struggles after her diagnosis with melanoma. In her witty, wisecracking narrative, Fogelson recounts how her battle with cancer brings up other issues in her life that she's been ignoring, especially her anxieties about her relationship with her husband, her friends, and her parents. The apprehension she feels soon manifests itself in more concrete ways,panic attacks, heavy reliance on alcohol, and a compulsive need to constantly check in with her doctor,but when her father discovers that he has melanoma as well, Fogelson has to learn to lead by example and let go of her fear. A story that will appeal to anyone who has faced adversity and lived to tell jokes about it, Pale Girl Speaks is about one woman who experienced the worst possible fallout of being fair-skinned,and survived with her sense of humour intact.

The Practical Nomad

By Edward Hasbrouck
Authors:
Edward Hasbrouck
The Practical Nomad provides a global perspective that's necessary whether you're a first-time trekker or an experienced explorer. Now more than ever it is important to understand other cultures, and Edward Hasbrouck's guide makes the ever-changing world more accessible. The fully updated fifth edition of The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World includes:Information on new airport security procedures, travel documents, entry requirements, and border crossings Tips on airline tickets and how to find the best deals without getting ripped off Advice on choosing destinations, routes, and traveling companionsHow to get the time and money for extended travel

Playing Cards In Cairo

By Hugh Miles
Authors:
Hugh Miles
PLAYING CARDS IN CAIRO is a fly-on-the-wall account - like THE BOOKSELLER OF KABUL - of life (for western readers) in a strange and exotic environment. Hugh Miles lives in Cairo and is engaged to an Egyptian woman. Twice a week he plays cards with a small group of Arab, Muslim women and through this medium he explores their lives in modern Cairo, the greatest of Arab cities. It is a secretive, romantic, often deprived but always soulful existence for the women as they struggle with abusive husbands and philandering boyfriends. The book is a window onto a city - and a way of life - which is at a crucial juncture in its history. Hugh Miles, who knows the Arab world intimately, is the perfect guide.
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Patti Smith's Horses

By Mark Paytress
Authors:
Mark Paytress
Before The Sex Pistols, before The Clash, before The Ramones, there was Patti Smith. The poet laureate of punk, she burst onto a vacuous music scene in the mid-1970s with a raw and revolutionary sound. With the release of her debut album, Horses, rock music would simply never be the same.Using all-new interviews with those close to Smith, Mark Paytress puts the story of Horses into its full context: from the singer's early days to her rapid rise on New York's performance art scene and the key role she played in the emerging art-punk movement at CBGBs. PATTI SMITH'S HORSES tells the unforgettable story of a landmark album, the new rock aesthetic that it brought about, and how Patti Smith became the most influential female rock 'n' roller of all time.

A Passage To Africa

By George Alagiah
Authors:
George Alagiah
As a five-year-old, George Alagiah emigrated with his family to Ghana - the first African country to attain independence from the British Empire. A PASSAGE TO AFRICA is Alagiah's shattering catalogue of atrocities crafted into a portrait of Africa that is infused with hope, insight and outrage. In vivid and evocative prose and with a fine eye for detail Alagiah's viewpoint is spiked with the freshness of the young George on his arrival in Ghana, the wonder with which he recounts his first impressions of Africa and the affection with which he dresses his stories of his early family life. A sense of possibility lingers, even though the book is full of uncomfortable truths. It is a book neatly balanced on his integrity and sense of obligation in his role as a writer and reporter. The shock of recognition is always there, but it is the personal element that gives A PASSAGE TO AFRICA its originality. Africa becomes not only a group of nations or a vast continent, but an epic of individual pride and suffering.
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The Pleasures All Mine

By Joan Kelly
Authors:
Joan Kelly
When Joan Kelly took a weekend job as a professional submissive in a private dungeon, it seemed she'd finally found a perfect outlet for her pent-up desires. Suddenly, Joan was being paid to do things she'd only fantasized about. Having spent several years scouring the Internet unsuccessfully for a man who would dominate her in the bedroom without getting on her nerves outside of it, Joan had nearly lost hope of satisfying her sexually submissive urges. Now, using her professional name, "Marnie," she was being paid to do only what she felt like with kinky men who didn't even expect to have any real sex in their sessions. To Joan, it almost felt like being paid to practice the art of self-centreedness-,except for the part where she had to kneel and address strangers as "Master." The Pleasure's All Mine offers the reader a rare, intimate, often amusing, sometimes disturbing look into the life of a professional submissive-,one whose drive for self-acceptance and respect is as relentless as her sexual need for the services she provides. Readers will experience many humorous, bizarre, frightening, and utterly entertaining events through the perceptive and insightful eyes of this writer.
  • Paris Was Yesterday

    By Janet Flanner
    Authors:
    Janet Flanner
    In 1925 Janet Flanner began writing a fortnightly 'Letter from Paris' for the nascent New Yorker. Her brief: to tell New Yorkers, under her pen name of 'Genet', what the French thought was going on in France, not what she thought.Paris Was Yesterday is a collection of those letters written in the '20s and '30s, surely one of the most fascinating periods in the city's history, and it reads like an Arts Who's Who. Flanner saw it all and knew everyone (or at least all about them), and there are tidbits galore about the likes of James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Isadora Duncan, Diaghilev, Gertrude Stein, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Picasso, Marlena Dietrich... It's witty, catty, literary and unashamedly gossipy, a lively portrait of the thriving cultural life in Paris between the wars. In the brilliantly entertaining style she made her own, Flanner mixed high and low culture to devastating effect.' Cafe Society described from the best table in the place, by a writer with rare & vivid gifts. Make yourself comfortable -- & order up a dry martini' Robert Lacey

    President Reagan

    By Lou Cannon
    Authors:
    Lou Cannon
    Hailed by the New Yorker as "a superlative study of a president and his presidency," Lou Cannon's President Reagan remains the definitive account of our most significant presidency in the last fifty years. Ronald Wilson Reagan, the first actor to be elected president, turned in the performance of a lifetime. But that performance concealed the complexities of the man, baffling most who came in contact with him. Who was the man behind the makeup? Only Lou Cannon, who covered Reagan through his political career, can tell us. The keenest Reagan-watcher of them all, he has been the only author to reveal the nature of a man both shrewd and oblivious. Based on hundreds of interviews with the president, the First Lady, and hundreds of the administration's major figures, President Reagan takes us behind the scenes of the Oval Office. Cannon leads us through all of Reagan's roles, from the affable cowboy to the self-styled family man from the politician who denounced big government to the president who created the largest peace-time deficit from the statesman who reviled the Soviet government to the Great Communicator who helped end the cold war.

    Patton

    By Essame
    Authors:
    Essame
    Four times since the breakout at Avranches Patton and his army had given Eisenhower opportunities which might well have proved decisive, shortened the war, saved thousands of lives and left the West in a better strategic posture than it would be more than a quarter of a century later. H. Essame's classic study of Patton in the "Military Commanders" series offers an outstanding description of his operational doctrine at all levels, from his own personal demeanor, the performance expected of his subordinates, the morale and discipline of his troops, to the actual tactics he used on the battlefield.Essame shows clearly how Patton's education and background enabled this cavalry officer to master the new battlefield conditions created by the tank and the airplane. Recognizing his lack of tact in dealing with allies and government leaders, Essame, who served in Europe as a brigade commander, nevertheless rates Patton as the greatest of all the Allied commanders.
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