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Lucha Libre

By Legends of Lucha Libre
Authors:
Legends of Lucha Libre
This Lucha Libre finger wrestling kit includes two vinyl lucha masks that cover your thumbs, two decorative capes, a wrestling ring, championship belt, and 48-page book about lucha libre and profiles of six wrestlers.
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The Little Box of Feminist Flair

By Lauren Mancuso, Anna Fleiss
Authors:
Lauren Mancuso
Illustrated by:
Anna Fleiss
Smash the patriarchy in style with The Little Box of Feminist Flair! With fabulous, fearless females like Michelle Obama, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Gloria Steinem, and Beyonce -- rendered as graphic, cross-stitch style portraits -- and empowering slogans, this kit brings a quirky spin to the feminist resistance. Learn about these inspiring women in a 48-page miniature book filled with punchy biographies, and add a touch of feminist flair to your outfit, bag, or home with this collection of 5 portrait-style pins, 2 iron-on patches, and 3 magnets. This kit includes:* 5 1/2-inch pins, featuring the faces of famous feminist icons. * 2 iron-on patches.* 3 magnets (1 text-based, 2 image-based). * 48-page miniature book.
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The Little Box of emoji

By Running Press
Authors:
Running Press
Following the success of our emoji: A Magnetic Kit comes this second mini kit including pins, patches, stickers, and magnets, the perfect package for emoji fans of all ages!This kit includes:* 10 emoji button pins* 1 iron-on patch* 3 magnets* 16-page sticker book
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The Little World of Liz Climo: A Magnetic Kit

By Liz Climo
Authors:
Liz Climo
Bring Liz Climo's hilarious cartoons to your fridge or office with The Little World of Liz Climo magnetic kit. This charming kit includes 10 magnetic single-panel cartoons and an adorable 32-page mini book
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Loose Lips

By Amy Stephenson, Casey Childers
Authors:
Amy Stephenson, Casey Childers
Fanfiction has always been there, lurking in the darkest corners of the internet. Two years ago, Amy Stephenson and Casey Childers found a way to drag it into the harsh fluorescent light of the Booksmith at Shipwreck: A monthly literary fanfiction competition. Now, Shipwreck has collected the most outrageous, perverted, brilliant wrecks based on 17 original works, from The Great Gatsby to The Hunger Games. LOOSE LIPS will contain cheeky illustrations, unintentionally suggestive quotes from the original source material, ­asides from the creators and the full text of the best submissions they've received. Writers include John Scalzi, Mara Wilson, Kate Leth, Night Vale writers Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, Kelly Link, Holly Black, Naomi Novik, Seanan McGuire, Heather Donahue, Andrew Sean Greer and illustrations by Madeline Gobbo. It's a loving look at all of our favorite books with feminism and female sexuality, queer identity and diversity at the forefront.

The Ludicrous Laws of Old London

By Nigel Cawthorne
Authors:
Nigel Cawthorne
London abounds with all manner of ludicrous laws, and not all of these curious statutes have been relegated to the past. Despite the efforts of the Law Commission there are medieval laws that are still in force, and the City of London and its livery companies have their own legal oddities. Laws are made in the capital because parliament is here; so are the Old Bailey, the Law Courts, the House of Lords and, now, the Supreme Court. The privy council, which sometimes has to decide cases, also sits in London, and there were other courts that used to sit in London, from prize courts concerning war booty to ecclesiastical courts. Having maintained its 'ancient rights and freedoms' under Magna Carta, the City felt free to enact its own laws, many of which seem to have had to do with what people could wear. Until quite recently, for example, a man could be arrested for walking down the street wearing a wig, a robe and silk stockings - unless he was a judge. And all human folly has been paraded through the law courts of London, to the extent that it is difficult to know where the serious business of administering justice ends and where farce begins. As law is made in the courtroom as well as in parliament and elsewhere, judges like to keep a firm hand, but sometimes so-called jibbing juries will simply not do what they are told. All sorts of oddities get swept up into the law. Legislators particularly love to pass Acts about sex. If sexual services are being offered in a London massage parlour, for example, a police officer must then search the premises for school children. According to The Children and Young Persons Act of 1933 it is against the law for children and 'yowling persons' between the age of four and sixteen to frequent a brothel. A writ was introduced under both Edward III and Henry IV to ban lawyers from parliament as there were too many of them, the reason being that it was easier for a lawyer to spend his time in London attending parliament that it was for a knight of the shires. But because parliament was already packed with lawyers it was difficult to make any such rule stick. Then an effective way of excluding them was found. They were denied the wages paid to members in those days. Sadly, these days, parliament and the government are packed with lawyers once again. And they are being paid.A law passed in 1540 - and still in force today - makes it illegal for barbers in the City of London to practise surgery; with impeccable impartiality, the Act also forbids surgeons to cut hair. Finally, never forget that under the Vagrancy Act of 1824, you can be convicted of being 'an idle and disorderly person, or a rogue, vagabond, or incorrigible rogue'. The same act also outlaws people 'professing to tell fortunes', including 'palmistry'. Under the Act, it is an offence merely to be suspected.
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Lucky Cat

By Danielle Selber
Authors:
Danielle Selber
Originating in Japanese culture, Lucky Cat, or maneki-neko , is regarded as a charm that brings good fortune to its owner. Included herein is a mini Lucky Cat figure with motorized arm and a 32-page illustrated book on the history of this ancient talisman.
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The Last Goodbye

By Matt Potter
Authors:
Matt Potter
History is written by the winners. It's the faithful servants, the insiders, the ones who stick around, who can adapt to almost any condition that get to write the official histories. They publish the memoirs, park in the directors' spots, erect the statues, form the new governments, wipe out the pockets of resistance, recruit the new starters, set the agendas, talk on the documentaries and retrospectives. Yet theirs - the official version - is never the whole story. The quitter's tale offers a far more compelling, and often a more honest version of history. The Last Goodbye, Matt Potter collects the pithiest, angriest, most hilarious messages of resignation throughout history, including those whose exits were a springboard to eventual success, such as Steve Jobs, George Orwell and Charlie Sheen.It's full of self-deception, bloody knives, betrayal, honour, disgrace, disgust, thwarted ambition and shattered hopes, and sometimes a wicked sting in the tail . . .
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Light

By Kimberly Arcand, Megan Watzke
Authors:
Kimberly Arcand, Megan Watzke
Light allows us to see everything around us, but humans can only see a sliver of all light, known as the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, Kim Arcand and Megan Watzke present the subject of light as never before. Organized along the order of the electromagnetic spectrum, each chapter focuses on a different type of light. From radio waves, harnessed for telecommunications, to X-rays, which let us peer inside the human body and view areas around black holes in deep space, Arcand and Watzke show us all the important ways light impacts us. An introductory chapter describes what light is and how it behaves, while hundreds of full-color photographs and illustrations demonstrate concepts and make for a stunning book that's a joy to read and browse.

Lobster Is the Best Medicine

By Liz Climo
Authors:
Liz Climo
Fans have fallen in love with Liz Climo's charmingly quirky animal kingdom, which was first featured in The Little World of Liz Climo ,a place where porcupines, anteaters, and grizzly bears all grapple with everyday life with wit and humour. Now Liz returns with a book devoted to friendship. Chapter themes include Old Friends," New Friends," Unlikely Friends," and Friends with Benefits." It's the perfect gift for a special friend.

The Lunatics Have Taken Over the Asylum

By Ian Hollingshead
Authors:
Ian Hollingshead
Telegraph letter writers, that most astute body of political commentators, are probably not alone in thinking that politics has taken some strange turns in recent years. The first coalition government since 1945 has led the country from the subprime to the ridiculous, lumbering from Leveson to Libya, riots to referendums, pasty-gate to pleb-gate, Brooks to Bercow, the Bullingdon Club to the Big Society.Five years is a long time in politics. Fortunately for us, it has also been a most fertile period for the Telegraph's legion of witty and erudite letter writers, who have their own therapeutic way of dealing with the pain. An institution in their own right, theirs is a welcome voice of sanity in a world in which the lunatics appear finally to have taken over the asylum.
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The Lost Sock

By Gillian Johnson
Authors:
Gillian Johnson
When a man loses one of his favourite pair of socks at the laundromat, he sets out on a quest to find out what happens to lost socks, and why every sock drawer contains a plethora of single socks. On his eventful journey, he discovers why you always lose the sock you love, visits a sockiatrist who teaches him about the Planet of Lost Socks, and eventually finds his perfect partner at a puppet show. A wryly sweet story of love, loss and destiny.
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The Little World of Liz Climo

By Liz Climo
Authors:
Liz Climo
Artist Liz Climo has charmed her fans with her comic world of whimsical animal characters, where everyone from grizzly bears, dinosaurs, rabbits, and anteaters grapple with everyday life with wit and humour. Through her comics, we discover that an armadillo can dress for Halloween, a dinosaur can be a loving parent ... and a rhino can squeeze orange juice! This new collection features more than 100 of her comics, starring her beloved characters in all kinds of funny situations, from celebrating holidays to helping friends.

Life at the Speed of Light

By J. Craig Venter
Authors:
J. Craig Venter
In 2010, scientists led by J. Craig Venter became the first to successfully create 'synthetic life' -- putting humankind at the threshold of the most important and exciting phase of biological research, one that will enable us to actually write the genetic code for designing new species to help us adapt and evolve for long-term survival. The science of synthetic genomics will have a profound impact on human existence, including chemical and energy generation, health, clean water and food production, environmental control, and possibly even our evolution.In Life at the Speed of Light, Venter presents a fascinating and authoritative study of this emerging field from the inside -- detailing its origins, current challenges and controversies, and projected effects on our lives. This scientific frontier provides an opportunity to ponder anew the age-old question 'What is life?' and examine what we really mean by 'playing God'. Life at the Speed of Light is a landmark work, written by a visionary at the dawn of a new era of biological engineering.
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Linked

By Albert-laszlo Barabasi
Authors:
Albert-laszlo Barabasi
A cocktail party. A terrorist cell. Ancient bacteria. An international conglomerate. All are networks, and all are a part of a surprising scientific revolution. In Linked , Albert-László Barabási, the nation's foremost expert in the new science of networks, takes us on an intellectual adventure to prove that social networks, corporations, and living organisms are more similar than previously thought. Barabási shows that grasping a full understanding of network science will someday allow us to design blue-chip businesses, stop the outbreak of deadly diseases, and influence the exchange of ideas and information. Just as James Gleick and the Erdos-Rényi model brought the discovery of chaos theory to the general public, Linked tells the story of the true science of the future and of experiments in statistical mechanics on the internet, all vital parts of what would eventually be called the Barabási-Albert model.

The Louvre Art Deck

By Anja Grebe, Erich Lessing
Authors:
Anja Grebe, Erich Lessing
Based on Black Dog's best-selling book The Louvre: All the Paintings, this beautiful, informative card deck is the perfect way to experience the treasures of one of the most spectacular masterpiece collections in the world. The Louvre is the most visited museum in the world. The paintings of the Louvre constitute the richest and grandest collection of European art anywhere.Culled from Black Dog's best-selling book The Louvre: All the Paintings, The Louvre Art Deck distills into 100 6 3/8' x 6 3/8' cards the museum's most iconic and significant paintings. Also included are 10 other masterpieces like The Venus de Milo and I.M. Pei's Pyramid. On the front side of each card is a fullsize photograph of the painting, and on the back is text by art historian Anja Grebe on the key attributes of the work, what to look for when viewing the painting, the artist's inspirations and techniques, biographical information on the artist, and more.The cards are also fully annotated with the name of the painting and artist, the date of the work, the birth and death dates of the artist, the medium that was used, the size of the painting, the Louvre catalogue number, and the room in the Louvre in which the painting can be found.Perfect for students, art lovers, and armchair travelers alike, The Louvre Art Deck is a unique way to enjoy and learn about the greatest works of the great master artists.

The Legend of Broken

By Caleb Carr
Authors:
Caleb Carr
Some years ago, a remarkable manuscript long rumoured to exist was discovered: The Legend of Broken. It tells of a prosperous fortress city, Broken, where order reigns at the point of a sword - even as scheming factions secretly vie for control of the surrounding kingdom. Meanwhile, outside the city's granite walls, an industrious tribe of exiles known as the Bane forages for sustenance in the wilds of Davon Wood.At every turn, the lives of Broken's defenders and its would-be destroyers intertwine until secretly, and under pressure from their people, four leaders unite. Together, they hope to exact a ruinous revenge on Broken, ushering in a day of reckoning when the mighty walls will be breached forever in a triumph of science over superstition.Breathtakingly profound and compulsively readable, Caleb Carr's long-awaited new book is an action-packed and enthralling masterpiece.
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Life's Ratchet

By Peter M. Hoffmann
Authors:
Peter M. Hoffmann
Life is an enduring mystery. Yet, science tells us that living beings are merely sophisticated structures of lifeless molecules. If this view is correct, where do the seemingly purposeful motions of cells and organisms originate? In Life's Ratchet , physicist Peter M. Hoffmann locates the answer to this age-old question at the nanoscale.Below the calm, ordered exterior of a living organism lies microscopic chaos, or what Hoffmann calls the molecular storm,specialized molecules immersed in a whirlwind of colliding water molecules. Our cells are filled with molecular machines, which, like tiny ratchets, transform random motion into ordered activity, and create the purpose" that is the hallmark of life. Tiny electrical motors turn electrical voltage into motion, nanoscale factories custom-build other molecular machines, and mechanical machines twist, untwist, separate and package strands of DNA. The cell is like a city,an unfathomable, complex collection of molecular workers working together to create something greater than themselves.Life, Hoffman argues, emerges from the random motions of atoms filtered through these sophisticated structures of our evolved machinery. We are agglomerations of interacting nanoscale machines more amazing than anything in science fiction. Rather than relying on some mysterious life force" to drive them,as people believed for centuries,life's ratchets harness instead the second law of thermodynamics and the disorder of the molecular storm.Grounded in Hoffmann's own cutting-edge research, Life's Ratchet reveals the incredible findings of modern nanotechnology to tell the story of how the noisy world of atoms gives rise to life itself.

A Little Bit of Slap & Tickle

By Tom Cutler
Authors:
Tom Cutler
A FREE extended extract from Slap and Tickle: The Unusual History of Sex and The People Who Have It.Slap and Tickle is a romp through the enduringly popular subject of sex, embracing vivid literature, language, history, and personalities.It covers sex in all its delightful variety, taking a light-hearted look at the biological mechanics, and drawing on the intimate true-life stories of sex-havers young and old, professional and amateur. Slap and Tickle is eclectic, entertaining, and original - a curious fact-filled volume, written in Tom Cutler's quirky and irreverent style.

Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me

By Chelsea's Family, Friends, and Other Victims
Authors:
Chelsea's Family, Friends, and Other Victims
"My tendency to make up stories and lie compulsively for the sake of my own amusement takes up a good portion of my day and provides me with a peace of mind not easily attainable in this economic climate." - Chelsea Handler, from Chapter 10 of Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang It's no lie: Chelsea Handler loves to smoke out "dumbassness," the condition people suffer from that allows them to fall prey to her brand of complete and utter nonsense. Friends, family, co-workers--they've all been tricked by Chelsea into believing stories of total foolishness and behaving like total fools. Luckily, they've all lived to tell the tales and, for the very first time, write about them.