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Trump's America

By Newt Gingrich
Authors:
Newt Gingrich
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The Terror Years

By Lawrence Wright
Authors:
Lawrence Wright
Ten powerful pieces first published in The New Yorker recall the path terror in the Middle East has taken from the rise of al-Qaeda in the 1990s to the recent beheadings of reporters and aid workers by ISIS. With the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Looming Tower, Lawrence Wright became generally acknowledged as one of our major journalists writing on terrorism in the Middle East. This collection draws on several articles he wrote while researching that book as well as many that he's written since, following where and how al-Qaeda and its core cult-like beliefs have morphed and spread. They include an indelible impression of Saudi Arabia, a kingdom of silence under the control of the religious police; the Syrian film industry, then compliant at the edges but already exuding a feeling of the barely masked fury that erupted into civil war; the 2006-11 Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza, a study in disparate values of human lives. Others continue to look into al-Qaeda as it forms a master plan for its future, experiences a rebellion from within the organization, and spins off a growing web of terror in the world. The American response is covered in profiles of two FBI agents and a chief of the CIA. It ends with the recent devastating piece about the capture and beheading by ISIS of four American journalists and aid workers, and how the US government failed to handle the situation.
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The Trump Boom

By Andrew F. Puzder
Authors:
Andrew F. Puzder
CAPITALISM UNDER ATTACK explains the single biggest threat to the free enterprise system: the demonization of the profit motive. It demonstrates the urgent need to educate all Americans - but especially the next generation - about profit's vital role in our nation. CAPITALISM UNDER ATTACK traces how the path of human economic history has led to an era where making money, owning property, and trying to maximize profits are seen by a large segment of the world population as selfish and even anti-societal aims. Ironically, data shows these anti-capitalist sentiments are most prevalent - and spreading at troubling rates - in the societies that have benefited most from capitalism over the last century. Places like the United States and Western Europe are today proving remarkably susceptible to neo-Marxist and redistributive socialist ideology - among academics in America's premiere institutions, among historians, and among politicians who continually rail against corporate profits or the evil "One Percent." ANDY PUZDER reminds readers that the pursuit of profit was a lynchpin to America's success as a nation - and led to the creation of a middle class of shopkeepers, merchants, and entrepreneurs who could finally earn a living, succeed and fail, based on their own abilities. Puzder briefly traces the history of profit from ancient times, to its golden age after liberal philosophers like John Locke and Adam Smith defended the idea of individual rights and private property. He explains how their ideas reached their purest form in practice when they were given new life as the basis for the creation of the new United States of America. The world, led by that grand experiment in profit - the U.S. - has decided to reject and shame the idea of making money, and the consequences this shift could have in the future.
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Teammate

By David Ross, Don Yaeger
Authors:
David Ross, Don Yaeger
Of the many storylines to the Chicago Cubs incredible 2016 season was the late career renaissance of David Ross, the 39-year-old journeyman player affectionately known to his Cubs teammates as "Grandpa Rossy." Ross became the unlikely heart and soul of the championship team, who finally broke the near 100-year Cubs curse. At the end of the Cubs victorious game seven--in which Ross entered the game in the 5th inning and proceeded to hit a crucial home run (becoming the oldest player to homer in World Series History), he was carried off the field by his teammates. Ross's late career blossoming and role as a Cubs mentor has been one of the defining sports stories of 2016, inspiring a write-in campaign for him for the All Star game, an endless series of feature stories and becoming the nightly talk of TV analysts and sports radio. This book would be memoir of Ross' career -- written with veteran collaborator Don Yaeger -- with the championship run at Wrigley this year as the capstone through line. The book's captivating frame is the final day of Ross's career - Game 7 of the 2016 World Series, with looks book at pivotal moments in Ross' life and career. Ross's fairy-tale season is a feel-good story that captures the hearts of Cubs die-hards and baseball fans everywhere.
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Trump's War

By Michael Savage
Authors:
Michael Savage
In the #1 New York Times bestseller TRUMP'S WAR, the "Godfather of Trumpmania," Michael Savage, examines the initial appointments, speeches, tweets and history of President Donald Trump and offers his insights and analysis.The man many consider to be the determining factor in driving Trump over the finish line by motivating millions of undecideds and the "Deplorables," who would have otherwise sat out the election, provides a crucial first look at the early direction of the Trump presidency.Savage has waged a twenty-five year war on the radio to save America's borders, language and culture from a progressive onslaught that is already turning Europe into a socialist, multiculturalist nightmare, where violent gangs of radical Islamic refugees terrorize defenseless citizens on a daily basis.While most in the chattering classes around the world dismissed Trump's campaign, conservative radio icon Dr. Michael Savage championed Trump's platform and helped him galvanize the support of disaffected middle Americans left behind by the globalist central planners in their distant capitol.Savage's army of listeners on The Savage Nationwas instrumental in electing Donald Trump to take the fight to Washington. But electoral victory was only the beginning. Trump now has an even bigger challenge in delivering on the promises he made to millions of American voters.
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Turning

By Jessica J. Lee
Authors:
Jessica J. Lee
'The water slips over me like cool silk. The intimacy of touch uninhibited, rising around my legs, over my waist, up to my collarbone. When I throw back my head and relax, the lake runs into my ears. The sound of it is a muffled roar, the vibration of the body amplified by water, every sound felt as if in slow motion . . .' Summer swimming . . . but Jessica Lee - Canadian, Chinese and British - swims through all four seasons and especially loves the winter. 'I long for the ice. The sharp cut of freezing water on my feet. The immeasurable black of the lake at its coldest. Swimming then means cold, and pain, and elation.'At the age of twenty-eight, Jessica Lee, who grew up in Canada and lived in London, finds herself in Berlin. Alone. Lonely, with lowered spirits thanks to some family history and a broken heart, she is there, ostensibly, to write a thesis. And though that is what she does daily, what increasingly occupies her is swimming. So she makes a decision that she believes will win her back her confidence and independence: she will swim fifty-two of the lakes around Berlin, no matter what the weather or season. She is aware that this particular landscape is not without its own ghosts and history.This is the story of a beautiful obsession: of the thrill of a still, turquoise lake, of cracking the ice before submerging, of floating under blue skies, of tangled weeds and murkiness, of cool, fresh, spring swimming - of facing past fears of near drowning and of breaking free.When she completes her year of swimming Jessica finds she has new strength, and she has also found friends and has gained some understanding of how the landscape both haunts and holds us.This book is for everyone who loves swimming, who wishes they could push themselves beyond caution, who understands the deep pleasure of using their body's strength, who knows what it is to allow oneself to abandon all thought and float home to the surface.
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There Are No Dead Here

By Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno
Authors:
Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno
There Are No Dead Here is the untold story of three brave Colombians who stood up to the paramilitary groups that, starting in the mid-1990s, decimated the country in the name of counterinsurgency and drug profits. With the complicity of much of Colombia's military and political establishment and in a climate of widespread fear and denial, the paramilitaries massacred, raped, and tortured thousands, and seized the land of millions of peasants forced to flee their homes. The United States, more interested in the appearance of success in its own War on Drugs, largely ignored them. Few dared to confront them.Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews and five years on the ground in Colombia, Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno takes readers from the sweltering Medellín streets where criminal investigators constantly looked over their shoulders for assassins on motorcycles, through the countryside where paramilitaries wiped out entire towns in gruesome massacres, and into the corridors of the presidential palace in Colombia's capital, Bogota. Throughout, she tells the interconnected stories of three very different Colombians bound by their commitment to the truth. The first is the gregarious Jesús María Valle, whose prophetic warnings about the military's complicity with the paramilitaries got him killed in 1998. A decade later, Valle's friend, the shy prosecutor Ivan Velasquez, became an unlikely hero when his groundbreaking investigations landed a third of the country's congress in prison for conspiring with paramilitaries, and put him in the crosshairs of Colombia's then wildly popular president, US protégé Álvaro Uribe. When Uribe's smear campaign against Velasquez threatened to bury the truth, the scrawny investigative journalist Ricardo Calderón exposed the lies, revealing that the paramilitaries' reach extended all the way into the presidency.Thanks to the efforts of Valle, Velasquez, and Calderón, Colombians now know the truth about the brutality and corruption that swept like a lethal virus through the country's society and political system. And slowly, the country is breaking free from the paramilitaries' grip.

Two Sisters

By Asne Seierstad
Authors:
Asne Seierstad
One morning in October 2013, nineteen-year-old Ayan Juma and her sixteen-year-old sister Leila left their family home in Oslo. Later that day they sent an email to their parents. 'Peace, God's mercy and blessings upon you, Mum and Dad ... Please do not be cross with us...' Leila and Ayan had decided to travel to Syria, 'and help out down there as best we can'. They had been planning for months. By the time their desperate father Sadiq tracks them to Turkey, they have already crossed the border. But Sadiq is determined to find them. What follows is the gripping, heartbreaking story of a family ripped apart. While Sadiq risks his own life to bring his daughters back, at home his wife Sara begins to question their life in Norway. How could her children have been radicalised without her knowledge? How can she protect her two younger sons from the same fate? Åsne Seierstad - with the complete support of the Juma family - followed the story from the beginning, through its many dramatic twists and turns. It's a tale that crosses from Sadiq and Sara's original home in Somalia, to their council estate in Oslo, to Turkey and to Syria - where two teenage sisters must face the shocking consequences of their decision.
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Traitors

By Frank Walker
Authors:
Frank Walker
In October 1943 Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Josef Stalin signed a solemn pact that once their enemies were defeated the Allied powers would 'pursue them to the uttermost ends of the earth and will deliver them to their accusers in order that justice may be done'. Nowhere did they say that justice would be selective. But it would prove to be.TRAITORS outlines the treachery of the British, American and Australian governments, who turned a blind eye to those who experimented on Australian prisoners of war. Journalist and bestselling author Frank Walker details how Nazis hired by ASIO were encouraged to settle in Australia and how the Catholic Church, CIA and MI6 helped the worst Nazi war criminals escape justice. While our soldiers were asked to risk their lives for King and country, Allied corporations traded with the enemy; Nazi and Japanese scientists were enticed to work for Australia, the US and UK; and Australia's own Hollywood hero Errol Flynn was associating with Nazi spies. The extraordinary revelations in TRAITORS detail the ugly side of war and power and the many betrayals of our ANZACs. After reading this book you can't help but wonder, what else did they hide?
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This Is an Uprising

By Mark Engler, Paul Engler
Authors:
Mark Engler, Paul Engler
"Absorbing... Ambitious... Indispensable. A genuine gift to social movements everywhere." -Naomi KleinFrom protests around climate change and immigrant rights, to Occupy, the Arab Spring, and #BlackLivesMatter, a new generation is unleashing strategic nonviolent action to shape public debate and force political change. When mass movements erupt onto our television screens, the media consistently portrays them as being spontaneous and unpredictable. Yet, in this book, Mark and Paul Engler look at the hidden art behind such outbursts of protest, examining core principles that have been used to spark and guide moments of transformative unrest.With incisive insights from contemporary activists, as well as fresh revelations about the work of groundbreaking figures such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Gene Sharp, and Frances Fox Piven, the Englers show how people with few resources and little conventional influence are engineering the upheavals that are reshaping contemporary politics.Nonviolence is usually seen simply as a philosophy or moral code. This Is an Uprising shows how it can instead be deployed as a method of political conflict, disruption, and escalation. It argues that if we are always taken by surprise by dramatic outbreaks of revolt, we pass up the chance to truly understand how social transformation happens.
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The Trade

By Jere Van Dyk
Authors:
Jere Van Dyk
In 2008, American journalist Jere Van Dyk was kidnapped and held for 45 days. At the time, he had no idea who his kidnappers were. They demanded a ransom and the release of three of their comrades from Guantanamo, yet they hinted at their ties to Pakistan and to the Haqqani network, a uniquely powerful group that now holds the balance of power in large parts of Afghanistan and the tribal areas of Pakistan. After his release, Van Dyk wrote a book about his capture and what it took to survive in this most hostile of circumstances. Yet he never answered the fundamental questions that his kidnapping raised: Why was he taken? Why was he released? And who saved his life?Every kidnapping is a labyrinth in which the certainties of good and bad, light and dark are merged in the quiet dialogues and secret handshakes that accompany a release or a brutal fatality. In The Trade, Jere Van Dyk uses the sinuous path of his own kidnapping to explain the recent rise in the taking of Western hostages across the greater Middle East. He discovers that he was probably not taken by the anonymous "Taliban," as he thought, but by the very people who helped arrange his trip and then bargained for his release. It was not a matter of chance: CBS, Van Dyk's employer at the time, launched a secret rescue and, he learned later, paid an undisclosed ransom to a tribal chief who controlled the area in which he was kidnapped and who delivered him and his guide safely to a US Army base. In 2013, Van Dyk returned to the Middle East to unravel the links among jihadist groups, specifically that of the Haqqani network. His investigation finally paid off in 2015, when Van Dyk was taken to a discreet room in a guesthouse in Islamabad where he met Ibrahim Haqqani, part of the leadership of the Haqqani network who has been seen by very few outsiders since 9/11. There, Van Dyk learned of the Haqqanis' links to Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, the ISI, and the CIA and their involvement in the kidnapping of Bowe Bergdahl and many others. Back in the United States, Van Dyk saw the other side of the kidnapping labyrinth as he became involved with other former hostages and the families of recent kidnapping victims murdered by the Islamic State. Van Dyk's investigation shows how America's foreign policy strategy, the terrible cynicism of the kidnappers, and a world of shadowy interlocutors who play both sides of many bargains combine to create a brutal business out of the exchange of individual human lives for vast sums of money.

To the Finish Line

By Chrissie Wellington
Authors:
Chrissie Wellington
Being mentored by Chrissie Wellington would be a dream for any triathlete. In To The Finish Line Chrissie presents her distilled wisdom, hard-won over the course of her extraordinary career, to give all triathletes the chance to learn from the very best.Chrissie writes with emotional honesty, and her warmth and sense of humour also shine through. She speaks frankly about her own experiences - both good and bad - from her career. Such stories will be a source of great inspiration to readers.The book will also be an invaluable practical resource for triathletes. It contains a significant amount of easily-applicable advice on subjects ranging from training tips through to mental strength, transition techniques and nutrition.
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Touched By God

By Diego Maradona, Daniel Arnucci
Authors:
Diego Maradona, Daniel Arnucci
In June 1986 Diego Maradona, considered by many to be the greatest footballer of all time, proudly hoisted the '86 Mexico World Championship Cup in his hands.Now thirty years on from that magical game, and after a life in sports marked by controversy, Maradona tells, for the first time, the untold stories behind that one-of-a-kind World Cup. Mexico '86 was the pinnacle of Maradona's career, and in this book he will reveal all about every game, what happened afterwards in the locker room, the months leading up to the World Cup, when the team had to go to Mexico City a month early to avoid the overthrowing of the technical director by the Argentine president, Alfonsin, the mystery behind 'El Gran Capitán' Passarella ('78 World Cup Champion), the strategies and tactics that revolutionised the game, training in a country that was recovering from an earthquake, the public's hostility, the jerseys they went out to buy in Mexico City, the meeting in Colombia where the team really came together, his relationship to drugs: the clean World Cup, and the best goal in football history. Mexico '86 is Maradona's World Cup and Maradona is who he is because of that World Cup. Explosive, gritty and unapologetic, Touched by God will tell the inside story of one of the greatest football victories of all time.
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The Time Of Our Lives

By Peggy Noonan
Authors:
Peggy Noonan
Peggy Noonan is one of the most brilliant and influential political thinkers and writers of our time. The author of five bestselling books (What I Saw at the Revolution is now a classic), her column in The Wall Street Journal is a must-read for millions of Americans. Witty, incisive and always original, Peggy Noonan is a conservative intellectual with wide reaching appeal across the political spectrum. Now, for the first time, the best of Noonan's writing will be collected in one indispensable volume. With a special, original introduction, she chronicles her career in journalism, the Reagan White House, and the political arena. Annotated and analysed throughout, Peggy expands a lifetime of wonderful writing into an astute examination of American life.
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The Torture Report

By Sid Jacobson
Authors:
Sid Jacobson
On December 9, 2014, the Senate Intelligence Committee released a 576-page report that strongly condemned the CIA for its secret and brutal use of torture in the treatment of prisoners during the George W. Bush Administration after 9/11. This deeply researched and fully documented investigation caused monumental controversy, interest, and concern, yet much of the American public found the report to be dense and inaccessible to the general reader. Using their tried, tested, and celebrated graphic storytelling method, Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón have summarized, illustrated, and made accessible the damning torture report. Jacobson's text highlights the key lessons learned from the Report-that the CIA lied about the brutality of the techniques used, about their effectiveness, about how many people they detained and subjected to these techniques, and that they routinely dismissed the concerns expressed by interrogators in the field. Colón's unmistakable talent as an illustrator adds power and poignancy to the facts, infusing them with a sense of immediacy and humanity that is unforgettable. With its unique format, The Torture Report will finally allow Americans to lift the veil and fully understand the crimes committed by the CIA.

Too Dumb to Fail

By Matt K. Lewis
Authors:
Matt K. Lewis
In 1963 Richard Hofstadter published his landmark book Anti-Intellectualism in American Life. Today, Matt Lewis argues, America's inclination toward simplicity and stupidity is stronger than ever, and its greatest victim is the Republican Party. Lewis, a respected Republican columnist and frequent MSNBC contributor, eviscerates the phenomenon of candidates with a "no experience required" mentality and tea party "patriots" who possess bluster but few core beliefs. Lewis traces the conservative movement's roots, from Edmund Burke to William F. Buckley, and from Goldwater's loss to Reagan's landslide victory. He highlights visionary thinkers who embraced nuance and deep ideology and changed history.
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Twilight Warriors

By James Kitfield
Authors:
James Kitfield
With the planned withdrawal of US troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, the longest conflicts in our nation's history were supposed to end. Yet we remain at war against expanding terrorist movements, and our security forces have had to continually adapt to a nihilistic foe that operates in the shadows.The result of fifteen years of reporting, Twilight Warriors is the untold story of the tight-knit brotherhood that changed the way America fights. James Kitfield reveals how brilliant innovators in the US military, Special Forces, and the intelligence and law enforcement communities forged close operational bonds in the crucibles of Iraq and Afghanistan, breaking down institutional barriers to create a relentless, intelligence-driven style of operations. At the forefront of this profound shift were Stanley McChrystal and his interagency team at Joint Special Operations Command, the pioneers behind a hybrid method of warfighting: find, fix, finish, exploit, and analyze. Other key figures include Michael Flynn, the visionary who redefined the intelligence gathering mission the FBI's Brian McCauley, who used serial-killer profilers to track suicide bombers in Afghanistan and the Delta Force commander Scott Miller, responsible for making team players out of the US military's most elite and secretive counterterrorism units. The result of their collaborations is a globe-spanning network that is elegant in its simplicity and terrifying in its lethality. As Kitfield argues, this style of operations represents our best hope for defending the nation in an age of asymmetric warfare. Twilight Warriors is an unprecedented account of the American way of war,and the iconoclasts who have brought it into the twenty-first century.

Taut Lines

By Cameron Pierce
Authors:
Cameron Pierce
THE PERFECT FATHER'S DAY GIFT!Since the earliest writings of civilization, people have been writing about fish and the pursuit of them. Taut Lines is a book of the present with regular forays into the past, reflecting not on where we're going, but where we've come from.As all anglers know, the fish themselves are only half of fishing. Finding peace, spirituality, or a sense of belonging in nature; the meditative tranquility that settles into the mind and body as you cast into the waters for hours on end; the companionship or, alternately, the solitude: these are some of the things that hook anglers as much as the fish. They are all explored in this book.In the name of variety, coverage has been extended to some fishes typically overlooked in fishing anthologies, up to the great white shark from Jaws, the most famous (and feared) fish in all of film and literature. There are as many types of fishing literature as there are fishermen. One of these is humorous stories about the follies that inevitably plague anglers. Several stories of this type are to be found in Taut Lines, including Rudyard Kipling's 'On Dry-Cow Fishing as a Fine Art' and Eric Witchey's 'Bats, Bushes, and Barbless Hooks.' Fishing is more than folly, however, and so many of the stories tackle more personal and profound subjects. Kevin Maloney's 'Soldiers By the Side of the Road', Gretchen Legler's 'Border Water', and Gabino Iglesias's 'Fourteen Pounds Against the World' are just three of many heartbreaking essays which prove that while fishing is an effective medicine for grief and loss, it can also lead to contemplations of death and mortality, both the fish's and our own. A passion for angling is most often passed down through families, and so many of the pieces in Taut Lines examine familial dynamics in relation to fishing, like 'Fish' by Judith Barrington and 'Unsound' by Nick Mamatas. There are great stories of big fish by angling legends such as Jeremy Wade, Bill Heavey, and Zane Grey, along with stories of daring rescues ('The Man in the Fish Tote' by Tele Aadsen) and war ('I Used to Be a Fisherman' by Weston Ochse), alongside a new modernized version of the first text written about sportfishing, 'Treatise of Fishing with an Angle' by Dame Juliana Berners and 'Fishing for a Cat' by Francis W. Mather, perhaps the earliest known essay devoted to catfish angling. There are also some long-lost classics, like former Atlantic editor Bliss Perry's 'Fishing with a Worm'.
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Trump Talking

By Al Cimino
Authors:
Al Cimino
'Part of the beauty of me is that I'm very rich'But that's just part of it. His fingers, too, are 'long and beautiful'. Improbably coiffed, perma-tanned and bronze-tongued, the Donald has increasingly impinged on the world's consciousness through a string of startling pronouncements.From his preference for war heroes who have not been captured, to his references to his sleeping around in the 1980s as his 'personal Vietnam' or this - 'My grandparents didn't come to America all the way from Germany to see it get taken over by immigrants' - Trump's utterances are nothing if not intriguing. As he once said, and to date this has been hard to dispute, he 'could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody, and [he] wouldn't lose any voters.'Here, in his own words, is the businessmen, the dealmaker, TV personality, author and one-time Democrat, now Republican who would be president of the United States.
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To Protect and Serve

By Norm Stamper
Authors:
Norm Stamper
The police in America belong to the people,not the other way around. Yet millions of Americans experience their cops as racist, brutal, and trigger-happy: an overly aggressive, militarized enemy of the people. For their part, today's officers feel they are under siege,misunderstood, unfairly criticized, and scapegoated for society's ills. Is there a fix? Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper believes there is.Policing is in crisis. The last decade has witnessed a vast increase in police aggression, misconduct, and militarization, along with a corresponding reduction in transparency and accountability. It is not just noticeable in African American and other minority communities,where there have been a series of high-profile tragedies,but in towns and cities across the country. Racism,from raw, individualized versions to insidious systemic examples,appears to be on the rise in our police departments. Overall, our police officers have grown more and more alienated from the people they've been hired to serve.In To Protect and Serve , Stamper delivers a revolutionary new model for American law enforcement: the community-based police department. It calls for fundamental changes in the federal government's role in local policing as well as citizen participation in all aspects of police operations: policymaking, program development, crime fighting and service delivery, entry-level and ongoing education and training, oversight of police conduct, and- especially relevant to today's challenges- joint community-police crisis management. Nothing will ever change until the system itself is radically restructured, and here Stamper shows us how.