Michael Paterson - A Brief History of the Private Life of Elizabeth II - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781780330747
    • Publication date:19 Jan 2012
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    • ISBN:9781472142245
    • Publication date:02 Aug 2018
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A Brief History of the Private Life of Elizabeth II

By Michael Paterson

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

The Life behind the Palace Doors - a celebration of the 60 year reign of Elizabeth II.

Elizabeth II is within a few years of becoming the longest-reigning British monarch. A personally quiet, modest and dutiful person, she is far better-informed about the lives of her subjects than they often realize. She has known every Prime Minister since Winston Churchill and every American President since Eisenhower.Yet what of the woman behind the crown?

The book seeks to take a new look at this exhaustively-documented life and show how Queen Elizabeth became the person she is. Who, and what, have been the greatest influences upon her? What are her likes and dislikes? What are her hobbies? Who are her friends? What does she feel about the demands of duty and protocol? Is she really enjoying herself when she smiles during official events? How differently does she behave when out of the public eye? Examining the places in which she grew up or has lived, the training she received and her attitudes to significant events in national life, it presents a fresh view of one of recent history's most important figures.

Biographical Notes

Michael Paterson is a writer and researcher, and has worked at the Imperial War Museum. He is the author of Dickens' London and the Brief History of Life in Victorian Britain.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781849015813
  • Publication date: 19 Jan 2012
  • Page count: 256
  • Imprint: Robinson
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