Anthony Blond - A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472103628
    • Publication date:25 Oct 2012
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A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors

By Anthony Blond

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

Even more scurrilous than 'Rome', A Brief History of the Private Lives of the Roman Emperors tells the true story of toga parties, banquets, and the scandalous life of the Caesars. Ancient history with all the boring bits taken out.

With the recent success of 'Rome' on BBC2, no one will look at the private lives of the Roman Emperors again in the same light.

Anthony Blond's scandalous expose of the life of the Caesars is a must-read for all interested in what really went on in ancient Rome.

Julius Caesar is usually presented as a glorious general when in fact he was an arrogant charmer and a swank; Augustus was so conscious of his height that he put lifts in his sandals.

But they were nothing compared to Caligula, Claudius and Nero. This book is fascinating reading, eye-opening in its revelations and effortlessly entertaining.

Biographical Notes

Anthony Blond was previously a publisher and an author of numerous books includingThe World of Simon Raven and his autobiography Jew Made in England. He regularly writes for the Spectator and the Literary Review.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781845297190
  • Publication date: 28 Feb 2008
  • Page count: 256
  • Imprint: Robinson
This is the sort of book that gives ancient history a good name. — Sunday Telegraph
...informative fun... — TLS
Lively and amusing - the Emperors enjoyably monstrous. — Observer
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