Florence King - Confessions Of A Failed Southern Lady - Little, Brown Book Group

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Confessions Of A Failed Southern Lady

By Florence King

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

* A side-splitting story of growing up different in the Old South.

Granny worked so hard at my rearing. She was a frustrated ladysmith and I was her last chance. . . This is the story of my years on her anvil. Whether she succeeded in making a lady out of me is for you to decide, but I will say one thing in my own favour before we begin. No matter which sex I went to bed with, I never smoked on the street.'

When Florence King was born, her Granny, a would-be Virginia grande dame, moved in. 'Anybody could have a family,' writes Miss King. 'She wanted a race all to herself.' Granny's dream of raising the perfect Southern belle failed dismally with her own daughter, a chain-smoking, baseball-playing tomboy given to wild expletives. Florence is Granny's last hope . . .

Biographical Notes

Florence King was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Virginia.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844081288
  • Publication date: 01 Jun 2006
  • Page count: 288
  • Imprint: Virago
Ought to be printed with a mechanism for turning down the volume of the reader . . . Outrageous and laugh-out-loud funny — Sandi Toksvig
I've never read so many perfect one-liners . . . This book is dynamite. Don't miss it — Jeanette Winterson
Gerald Durrell — 'One of the funniest writers around’
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