Janet Flanner - Paris Was Yesterday - Little, Brown Book Group

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Books in this series

Paris Was Yesterday

1925-1939

By Janet Flanner

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

* Witty, catty and entertaining, Paris Was Yesterday is an insider's guide to the arts scene in Paris between the wars

In 1925 Janet Flanner began writing a fortnightly 'Letter from Paris' for the nascent New Yorker. Her brief: to tell New Yorkers, under her pen name of 'Genet', what the French thought was going on in France, not what she thought.
Paris Was Yesterday is a collection of those letters written in the '20s and '30s, surely one of the most fascinating periods in the city's history, and it reads like an Arts Who's Who. Flanner saw it all and knew everyone (or at least all about them), and there are tidbits galore about the likes of James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Isadora Duncan, Diaghilev, Gertrude Stein, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Picasso, Marlena Dietrich... It's witty, catty, literary and unashamedly gossipy, a lively portrait of the thriving cultural life in Paris between the wars. In the brilliantly entertaining style she made her own, Flanner mixed high and low culture to devastating effect.

' Cafe Society described from the best table in the place, by a writer with rare & vivid gifts. Make yourself comfortable -- & order up a dry martini' Robert Lacey

Biographical Notes

Janet Flanner was born in 1892 in Indianapolis & went to Europe in 1921, where she spent the rest of her life, mainly in Paris. Her Paris Journal 1944-1965 won the National Book Award. A member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters, Flanner alsoreceived the Legion of Honor.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844080267
  • Publication date: 04 Dec 2003
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Virago
If you'd like to feel that you are in Les Deux Magots, or Cafe Fleur, listening to Sartre or Cocteau; if you'd like to hear the gossip about the gendarmerie asking Marlene Dietrich to leave Paris because she had the audacity to wear trousers in public or if you'd like to meet James Joyce in The Shakespear & Company Book Store; if you'd like to attend one of Gertrude Stein's intellectual discussions & meet her companion, Alice B. Toklas, then this book is for you — Amazon.com
Lively and witty...fascinating escapist entertainment — Leeds Guide
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