Bamber Gascoigne - A Brief History of the Dynasties of China - Little, Brown Book Group

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A Brief History of the Dynasties of China

By Bamber Gascoigne

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

By focusing on the key colourful characters of the eight major dynasties, Bamber Gascoigne brings to life 3500 years of Chinese civilization.

Although China's great empire lasted for longer than any other, no country has suffered so great an imbalance between the fame of its art and obscurity of its history. The names of the great dynasties are familiar, yet who can actually locate a T'ang horse or a Ming vase in its social or cultural context?

By focusing on the key colourful characters of the eight major dynasties, Bamber Gascoigne brings to life 3500 years of Chinese civilization. His bird's-eye view starts on the borders of myth. It moves swiftly on to the greatest achievements of language and thought, the cultural treasures and imperial palaces, wars won and lands lost to the Mongols, finally to arrive at the 1912 Revolution, which contained within it the seeds of Communism that ensured the overthrow of the last emperor. Via this portrait of an empire and its peoples he has opened the door to a world for too long inaccessible to the West.

Biographical Notes

Bamber Gasgoigne won scholarships to Eton and Cambridge, and a Harkness Fellowship to Yale. He presented television's University Challenge for 25 years and has written several books, including The Treasures and Dynasties of China, A Brief History of the Great Moghuls and A Brief History of Christianity.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781841197913
  • Publication date: 25 Sep 2003
  • Page count: 240
  • Imprint: Robinson
Robinson

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Authors:
Catherine Whitlock, Rhodri Evans

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Dialogue Books

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Lisa Ko

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PublicAffairs

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Constable

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Piatkus

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Authors:
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Robinson

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Robinson

A Brief History of Florence Nightingale

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Robinson

Nicholas II, The Last Tsar

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Orbit

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A Brief History of the Martial Arts

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PublicAffairs

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Little, Brown

Viking Fire

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The year is 1066, and a great general has won a crushing victory over the English just outside the gates of York. His name is Harald Hardrada, King of the Norse, and he is the most brilliant warrior of his age. Driven into exile as a callow youth, he travelled the known world, deposed emperors, punished the heathens, and took the empress of Constantinople as lover. But there are demons too that he must conquer, and the uncomfortable fact of having a saint for a brother. He has just won his greatest victory, but a week later he too will be dead, and with his death the Viking Age will come to a close.Harald Hardrada is the last of the Vikings. This is his tale.

Robinson

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Abacus

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Little, Brown

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