Jasper Ridley - A Brief History of the Tudor Age - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781841194714
    • Publication date:28 Mar 2002
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A Brief History of the Tudor Age

By Jasper Ridley

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  • £P.O.R.

100 years of splendour and squalor

From the arrival of Henry Tudor and his army, at Milford in 1485, to the death of the great Queen Elizabeth I in 1603, this was an astonishingly eventful and contradictory age. All the strands of Tudor life are gathered in a rich tapestry - London and the country, costumes, furniture and food, travel, medicine, sports and pastimes, grand tournaments and the great flowering of English drama, juxtaposed with the stultifying narrowness of peasant life, terrible roads, a vast underclass, the harsh treatment of heretics and traitors, and the misery of the Plague.

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  • ISBN: 9781472107954
  • Publication date: 07 Feb 2013
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  • Imprint: Robinson
Constable

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