Susanna Gregory - The Tarnished Chalice - Little, Brown Book Group

The Tarnished Chalice

The Twelfth Chronicle of Matthew Bartholomew

By Susanna Gregory

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

The Twelfth Chronicle of Matthew Bartholomew - Cambridge's popular mediaeval physician and sleuth.

On a bitter winter evening in 1356, Matthew Bartholomew and Brother Michael arrive in Lincoln - Michael to accept an honour from the cathedral, and Bartholomew to look for the woman he wants to marry. It is not long before they learn that the friary in which they are staying is not the safe haven they imagine - one guest has already been murdered. It soon emerges that the dead man was holding the Hugh Chalice, a Lincoln relic with a curiously bloody history. Bartholomew and Michael are soon drawn into a web of murder, lies and suspicion in a city where neither knows who can be trusted.

Biographical Notes

Susanna Gregory was a police officer in Leeds before taking up an academic career. She has served as an environmental consultant, worked seventeen field seasons in the polar regions, and has taught comparative anatomy and biological anthropology.

She is the creator of the Matthew Bartholomew series of mysteries set in medieval Cambridge and the Thomas Chaloner adventures in Restoration London, and now lives in Wales with her husband, who is also a writer.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780751535457
  • Publication date: 07 Jun 2007
  • Page count: 512
  • Imprint: Sphere
Gripping and highly readable. — NOTTINGHAM EVENING POST
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