Robert Winder - Bloody Foreigners - Little, Brown Book Group
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    • ISBN:9780349115665
    • Publication date:21 Apr 2005
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    • ISBN:9780748123964
    • Publication date:04 Nov 2010

Bloody Foreigners

By Robert Winder

  • Paperback
  • £12.99

The story of immigration to Britain from the Romans to asylum seekers - a moving and inspiring history which chronicles the remarkable stories of immigration that founded and defined a nation

The story of the way Britain has been settled and influenced by foreign people and ideas is as old as the land itself. In this original, important and inspiring book, Robert Winder tells of the remarkable migrations that have founded and defined a nation.

'Our aristocracy was created by a Frenchman, William the Conqueror, who also created our medieval architecture, our greatest artistic glory. Our royal family is German, our language a bizarre confection of Latin, Saxon and, latterly, Indian and American. Our shops and banks were created by Jews. We did not stand alone against Hitler; the empire stood beside us. And our food is, of course, anything but British . . . Winder has a thousand stories to tell and he tells them well' Sunday Times

Biographical Notes

Robert Winder was literary editor of the Independent for five years and deputy editor of Granta magazine. He has written three novels, his most recent being The Final Act of Mr Shakespeare

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349138800
  • Publication date: 30 May 2013
  • Page count: 640
Supremely readable — The Times
Totally absorbing and revelatory . . . could not be more timely — Daily Mail
Enlightened and illuminating. Winder goes a long way towards defining what we are as a nation — Independent
He has a good eye for the telling anecdote. There is so much to intrigue and delight — Spectator
A breath of fresh air in a foul and fetid room — Sunday Times
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