Eric Hobsbawm - How To Change The World - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748121120
    • Publication date:20 Jan 2011

How To Change The World

Tales of Marx and Marxism

By Eric Hobsbawm

  • Paperback
  • £13.99

* Brilliant and incisive, HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD leaves us in no doubt that Karl Marx is as much a thinker for our century as he was for the preceding two

In the 144 years since Karl Marx's Das Kapital was published, the doctrine that bears his name has been embraced by millions in the name of equality, and just as dramatically has fallen from grace with the retreat of communism from the western world. But as the free market reaches its extreme limits in the economic and environmental fallout, a reassessment of capitalism's most vigorous and eloquent enemy has never been more timely.

Eric Hobsbawm provides a fascinating and insightful overview of Marxism. He investigates its influences and analyses the spectacular reversal of Marxism's fortunes over the past thirty years.

Biographical Notes

Eric Hobsbawm was born in Alexandria in 1917 and educated in Vienna, Berlin, London and Cambridge. A distinguished historian, he is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, with honorary degrees from universities in several countries.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349123523
  • Publication date: 19 Jan 2012
  • Page count: 480
  • Imprint: Abacus
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Abacus

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