Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors Published by Little, Brown Book Group

Search Our Authors

Author Surname

Filter By

Clear all
Our Authors
David Baddiel

David Baddiel co-created three of the most popular comedy programmes in BBC TV history and his stand-up comedy act is always a sell-out nationwide.
Beryl Bainbridge

Beryl Bainbridge was one of the greatest living novelists. Author of seventeen novels, two travel books and five plays for stage and television, she was shortlisted for the Booker Prize five times, and won many literary awards including the Whitbread Prize and the Author of the Year Award at the British Book Awards. She died in July 2010.
Joan Bakewell

A prominent figure in TV and the arts in Britain, Joan Bakewell has been a broadcaster for over forty years, a print journalist for over twenty years, and has published her autobiography, The Centre of the Bed. ALL THE NICE GIRLS was her first novel. She was made a Dame in 2008.
Josie Barnard

Josie Barnard has been an editor, journalist and radio broadcaster. Her first novel, POKER FACE (Virago), was the winner of a Betty Trask Award. She lives in London.
Janina Bauman

Janina Bauman was born Janina Lewinson in Warsaw into an assimilated, educated, well-off Jewish family of doctors. Hitler's invasion of Poland in September 1939 put an end to an idyllic childhood and saw Janina, her sister, Zosia, and their mother incarcerated in the Warsaw ghetto, and later, after their escape, beyond its walls. Series: Other livesPrevious | Next | Index Janina Bauman obituary (6)Tweet this (8)Lydia Bauman guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 26 January 2010 18.21 GMT Article history Janina Bauman's writings about her early life were characteristically non-judgmental and free of bitterness.My mother, Janina Bauman, who has died aged 83, was a writer who has left an indelible mark on the literature of the Holocaust. In the words of one of her many friends, she was "a truly beautiful person, who made things golden". Janina's serene demeanour and dreamy, thoughtful disposition, belied the turbulence of her early life as witness to the horrors of the Warsaw ghetto and postwar antisemitic purges in socialist Poland.Her testament to the times, and to the enduring human spirit, came in the form of two autobiographical volumes, both published by Virago - Winter in the Morning (1986), based on diaries she kept as a young girl during the war, and A Dream of Belonging (1988) - which were republished last year in one volume as Beyond These Walls.She was born Janina Lewinson in Warsaw into an assimilated, educated, well-off Jewish family of doctors. Hitler's invasion of Poland in September 1939 put an end to an idyllic childhood and saw Janina, her sister, Zosia, and their mother incarcerated in the Warsaw ghetto, and later, after their escape, beyond its walls. Dreaming of 'belonging', after enforced wartime idleness, Janina threw herself with passionate idealism into the cause of Zionism, and later into the rebuilding of socialist Poland. In March 1948, while studying journalism at the Warsaw Academy of Social Sciences, she met and found her soulmate in a 'handsome army captain', intellectual and committed communist, Zygmunt Bauman, whose proposal of marriage she accepted nine days later. Together they raised a family and pursued their careers - Janina rapidly advancing in the Polish film industry, Zygmunt as a lecturer in sociology at Warsaw University. Disillusionment with communism following the denouncement of Stalin by Khrushchev in 1956, and the pressures of antisemitic persecution compelled the Baumans to leave Poland for Israel in 1968, three years later settling in Leeds, West Yorkshire, where Zygmunt took on the chair of sociology at the university. It was there that Janina turned to writing - her moving testimonies characteristically non-judgmental and free of bitterness. She died in January 2009, aged 83.
Nina Bawden

Nina Bawden (1925-2012) was one of Britain's best-loved writers for both adults and children. Several of her children's books - Carrie's War, a Phoenix Award winner;The Peppermint Pig, which won the Guardian Fiction Award; and Keeping Henry - have become contemporary classics. She wrote over forty novels, slightly more than half of which are for adults, and she was shortlisted for the 1987 Man Booker Prize for Circles of Deceit. She received the prestigious S T Dupont Golden Pen Award for a lifetime's contribution to literature in 2004, and in 2010 The Birds on the Trees was shortlisted for the Lost Booker of 1970.
John Bayley

John Bayley is Fellow of St Catherine's College, Oxford.
Sally Beauman

Sally Beauman read English at Girton College, Cambridge. She worked as a journalist in America and Britain before beginning to write fiction. She is the author of six previous novels, including the acclaimed Rebecca's Tale.
Catherine Bennett

Catherine Bennett writes for the Guardian and the Observer. She lives in London.
Lauren Berry

Lauren Berry is the founding editor of satirical feminist magazine KnockBack. She has been featured in the Guardian, Observer and Easy Living. Lauren makes a living in branding and journalism under a variety of guises, including the pseudonym Marie Berry. She lives and works in London. Living the Dream is her first novel.
Ingrid Betancourt

Ingrid Betancourt lived in France and New Zealand before returning to Colombia to campaign for the presidency, when she was kidnapped.
Carol Birch

Carol Birch was born in 1951 in Manchester and went to Keele University. She has lived in London, southwest Ireland and now Lancaster. For her first novel, LIFE IN THE PALACE, she won the 1988 David Higham Award for the Best First Novel of the Year. In 1991 she won the prestigious Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize with THE FOG LINE.
Elizabeth Bishop

Elizabeth Bishop (1928-79) was one of the greatest, most beloved poets of the twentieth century. 'Helena Morley' was the pseudonym of Senhora Augusto Mario Caldeira Brant, whose diary was first published for her friends in 1942.
Jill Blakeway

Jill Blakeway, a British specialist in alternative medicine living and working in New York, was dubbed a 'fertility goddess' by the New York Times.
Mark Bostridge

Mark Bostridge (editor) co-wrote the biography of Vera Brittain and edited LETTERS FROM A LOST GENERATION
Joanna Bourke

Joanna Bourke is a professor of history at Birkbeck College in London. Her book An Intimate History of Killing received critical acclaim, winning the Wolfson History Prize.
Susie Boyt

Susie Boyt is the author of five other acclaimed novels and the much-loved memoir My Judy Garland Life which was shortlisted for the PEN Ackerley Prize, staged at the Nottingham Playhouse and serialised on BBC Radio 4. She has written about art, life and fashion for the Financial Times for the past fourteen years and has recently edited The Turn of the Screw and Other Ghost Stories by Henry James. She is also a director at the Hampstead Theatre.She lives in London with her family.
Celia Brayfield

Celia Brayfield is a bestselling novelist and a journalist. Her most recent novels, GETTING HOME, SUNSET and HEARTSWAP were published to great critical acclaim by Little Brown. She has one daughter and lives and works in London.
Vera Brittain

The author of TESTAMENT OF YOUTH and mother of Shirley Williams. Mark Bostridge (editor) co-wrote the biography of Vera Brittain and edited LETTERS FROM A LOST GENERATION.
Carrie Brownstein

Carrie Brownstein is a musician, writer and actor who first became widely known as the guitarist and vocalist of the band Sleater-Kinney and later as a creator, writer and co-star of the Emmy-nominated, Peabody Award winning television show Portlandia. Brownstein's writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Believer, Slate, and numerous anthologies on music and culture. She lives in Portland, Oregon and Los Angeles.